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Air Conditioning & Positive Pressure

svetz

Works in theory! Practice? That's something else
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A typical air conditioner creates a small negative pressure in the home which tends to increase the number of air changes per hour.

In high humidity areas, this can significantly increase your power bill. Consider that at 85% humidity a 2,500 sq ft home would have about 20 lbs of water in it, that is the air conditioner spends a great deal of energy condensing that water rather than cooling your home. The more air changes per hour, the more water vapor for the air conditioner to remove (e.g., 10 air changes would be a flow of 200 lbs of water).

But... Water is a polar molecule , can it be separated from the air electrically as makeup air (e.g., a positive pressure house)?

I googled around and found A review of electrically driven dehumidification technology for air-conditioning systems.

Apparently the idea has been kicked about since the 1930s, but started getting more traction this century.

As a bonus, one of the things I noted in the paper was mention of a liquid desiccant as opposed to electrical dehumidification. It was said to not be efficient because of the energy requirements to heat the desiccant to remove the water. Doesn't that just mean a synergy is needed between the heat pump (air conditioner) rejection temperature to regenerate the desiccant? If the electrical dehumidification works like a capacitor where the power is only to sustain the charge (e.g., very little actual power flow) than maybe it can't compete.


Thought I'd post on it to see if others had heard of this or know of promising upcoming tech.
 
Without the need to transmit power over long distances we are wasting energy, money, and time by doing all our conversions. Ac to dc and so on.

Try solving that and you will be getting somewhere. Everything else will follow. AC electricity is not the answer. We are always trying to put round peg in square hole and so on. We are creating our own point of power
 
A typical air conditioner creates a small negative pressure in the home which tends to increase the number of air changes per hour.

In high humidity areas, this can significantly increase your power bill. Consider that at 85% humidity a 2,500 sq ft home would have about 20 lbs of water in it, that is the air conditioner spends a great deal of energy condensing that water rather than cooling your home. The more air changes per hour, the more water vapor for the air conditioner to remove (e.g., 10 air changes would be a flow of 200 lbs of water).

But... Water is a polar molecule , can it be separated from the air electrically as makeup air (e.g., a positive pressure house)?

I googled around and found A review of electrically driven dehumidification technology for air-conditioning systems.

Apparently the idea has been kicked about since the 1930s, but started getting more traction this century.

As a bonus, one of the things I noted in the paper was mention of a liquid desiccant as opposed to electrical dehumidification. It was said to not be efficient because of the energy requirements to heat the desiccant to remove the water. Doesn't that just mean a synergy is needed between the heat pump (air conditioner) rejection temperature to regenerate the desiccant? If the electrical dehumidification works like a capacitor where the power is only to sustain the charge (e.g., very little actual power flow) than maybe it can't compete.


Thought I'd post on it to see if others had heard of this or know of promising upcoming tech.

Why do you think energy spent condensing water is wasted?

The wasted energy would be in the form of cooling air that ultimately escapes through the drafty gaps in the house you would only need to stop that vs trying to dehumidify the air that shouldn't be getting into the living space in the first place.

Pure silliness.
 

This is stated only = Second passive home built in the whole of SouthEast...... Took 2 years to build it so you know the high cost makes it unobtainable for mass home building. That darn ROI. How long has man kind been on this planet? We are still retarded. I am being serious. We are dumb asf.... if I was an alien arriving here would think cock roaches are smartest beings on planet. We been here all this time and still don`t know how to build a home. Centuries upon centuries. The Roman's roads buildings sewers still exist... we are retards.

These passive homes reportedly cost 3-5% more to build but they save 70-80% for heat - cooling.

These passive homes are so air tight that fresh air has to be brought in and bad air taken out. A fart would linger. Imagine cooking fish and smell never leaving. Me thinks we should go back to caves. Mongo.

The spray foam type encapsulated building construction means the wood can not be inspected for pest aka termites
Roofing done with standard shingles is a no go too. They asphalt shingles get to hot and self destruct. So have to use different roofing.


So we can cancel Christmas on spray foam. ...other reason not so many passive homes. Read link.

It takes more then just ac. So do we destroy our current homes and build new passive homes back in there place. The spray foam is a future negative. Again we must be retards. How long have we been here.... centuries... we are dumb asf. But we never admit. I have grown more retarded everyday.. I feel am not the only one. How did we get here without all the tech that we have now?
 
A typical air conditioner creates a small negative pressure in the home which tends to increase the number of air changes per hour.

You could have a look at mechanical ventilation and heat recovery units if you haven't already. I don't know if you can get them as part of your forced air air-conditioning systems over there. With split phase air-conditioning you probably don't need to worry about the negative pressure, but you would still want to have a look at mechanical ventilation.

If you are interested, the way you build your wood framed houses could do with some rethinking, you have way too many penetrations through the air barriers that are difficult and time consuming to seal.

 
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