BiduleOhm's project design WIP (30 kWh battery, 10 kW inverter, 16 kW PV)

BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
one other thing to consider. I chose to do a ground mount as I did not want to climb up 20 plus feet to the lower edge of the roof on my 1840 to 1880 vintage house with a ladder in the winter or summer for that matter. I do enough ladder work without asking for more. climb a ladder in the wind and you will realize the roof is not always the best choice. tie that ladder off at all times for safety. I do now.
it also needs the roof replaced. I built a separate insulated power shed for all the batteries and solar charge controllers with a locking door to keep the young ones away and any other nosy people. I went with 24-volt inverters but I also have a 48volt build going. I went with Electrodacus SBMS0 with Electrodacus DSSR20's for the charge controller. The SBMS0 is the brain or controller and protector for the expensive battery bank LiFePO4 wired 2P8S for a 13,926.4 Wh potential capacity using 16 272Ah Lishen cells. I am going to build 4 of these battery banks so will have over 13926.4 x 4 = 55,795.6 Wh capacity potential in these 4 24-volt LiFePO4 batteries.
easy to clean the snow off the ground mount. just go over and broom it off. :cool::cool:
I have 2 arrays I am working on now. of course, the south-facing array works great now, the west-facing array is to gain a little solar later in the day.

Ground mounted array isn't really ideal because I have a lot of trees around my garden, and for aesthetic reasons. If I really need more panels I could in theory add a pergola on the terrace and put panels on it, but I'd rather not have to do that.
 

michael d

Solar Enthusiast
Ground mounted array isn't really ideal because I have a lot of trees around my garden, and for aesthetic reasons. If I really need more panels I could in theory add a pergola on the terrace and put panels on it, but I'd rather not have to do that.
I totally understand the aesthetics issues.
I am out in the country without any real close neighbors on a long private driveway, so free to play with panel location a bit more.
did you look at the Electrodacus dssr20 with diversion as a heating option? the excess electricity from the solar panels can be diverted into hot water heating or into resistive wire heating. I bought 4 of the dssr20's to try out and bought 3 600 watt 24-volt water heating elements.
Dacian also talks about using 2 panels to generate heat to one panel by shorting 1/3 of the one panel.. you could also increase the panel mounting area by putting arrays on the other sides of the roof if possible. others talk about this idea.
I am using a big array small array setup idea and will have the big array facing south and the small array facing west.
time will tell how it all works but currently working good.
I like the Electrodacus approach to keep it simple and low cost - more bang for your buck.
the solid-state relays (dssr20's) replace the mppt's.
just some ideas for you to think about!:cool:
 

BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
did you look at the Electrodacus dssr20 with diversion as a heating option? the excess electricity from the solar panels can be diverted into hot water heating or into resistive wire heating. I bought 4 of the dssr20's to try out and bought 3 600 watt 24-volt water heating elements.

Yes, long story short I think the design isn't adapted at all to my case; not only a 24 V system would make wires bigger (and I already need pretty big ones...) but the direct connection PV/battery would need to have hundred of € in wires and it would still have bigger losses than with a high voltage system (I plan to be at around 300-400 V on the PV side). Also, given clouds and rain are common here I would basically crush the already low power available in winter without a MPPT.

I'll have diversion to resistive elements to heat water ;)


Dacian also talks about using 2 panels to generate heat to one panel by shorting 1/3 of the one panel..

What would be the goal of that besides loosing precious surface area?


you could also increase the panel mounting area by putting arrays on the other sides of the roof if possible. others talk about this idea.
I am using a big array small array setup idea and will have the big array facing south and the small array facing west.
time will tell how it all works but currently working good.

I have a 4 sided roof and the sides are facing almost perfectly N-E, S-E, S-W and N-W. What I thought was a disavantage at first is actually an advantage as I can overpanel more and not have a big spike in summer as if the panels were directly S oriented.


I like the Electrodacus approach to keep it simple and low cost - more bang for your buck.
the solid-state relays (dssr20's) replace the mppt's.

Not until you factor in the cost of the wire. And I can't just cheap out and use thinner wires as then losses would be enormous and efficiency is a priority here. And, again, no MPPT in winter...
 

michael d

Solar Enthusiast
Yes, long story short I think the design isn't adapted at all to my case; not only a 24 V system would make wires bigger (and I already need pretty big ones...) but the direct connection PV/battery would need to have hundred of € in wires and it would still have bigger losses than with a high voltage system (I plan to be at around 300-400 V on the PV side). Also, given clouds and rain are common here I would basically crush the already low power available in winter without a MPPT.

I'll have diversion to resistive elements to heat water ;)




What would be the goal of that besides loosing precious surface area?




I have a 4 sided roof and the sides are facing almost perfectly N-E, S-E, S-W and N-W. What I thought was a disavantage at first is actually an advantage as I can overpanel more and not have a big spike in summer as if the panels were directly S oriented.




Not until you factor in the cost of the wire. And I can't just cheap out and use thinner wires as then losses would be enormous and efficiency is a priority here. And, again, no MPPT in winter...
the panel with 1/3 shorted would be located in your living quarters where you want the heat. the 2 other panels would be outside. this requires no other components.
I am not sure where everyone(some people report incorrectly) keeps saying it takes larger gauge wire they are obviously wrong and mistaken. i have all panels wired with standard 10 gauge wire. i use PV red and PV black 10 gauge for easy color-coding. 10 gauge is the same wire use on almost all commercial PV solar panels. no big wire sizing required. I have read their incorrect quotations about the wire size and they are definitely wrong.
my polycrystalline 250-watt 60 cell panels produce 10 percent on cloudy days.
if mounting real estate is short the monocrystalline put out slightly better with a slightly smaller footprint. the advantage of dssr20 is no combiner boxes, no mppt's with short lives due to the capacitors. no high voltage to have to deal with special permits.
all good for a DIY person.
today I am hooking up the 3rd set of 2 panels.
if your distance to the panels to the dssr20 is less than 60 feet 10 gauge is fine for 60 cell panels up to 75 feet then you may want to use 72 cell panels. mine work great at about 60 feet with 10 gauge PV wire. I am in winter here now and the solar panels prefer the cold. no mppt in use in this off-grid build. just the solid-state relay dssr20. below freezing every night and almost all day for the next month or 2.
24volt LF PSW inverters are readily available on the internet and the distance from the inverter to the battery is always short 6 feet or less. I use 4/0 cable from battery to busbar which I connect the inverter to after the class t fuse. i have a 6000-watt LF PSW split phase inverter with 400 amp class t fuse.
just explaining how it (Electrodacus system)works. you decide what you build. there are 50 ways to accomplish the same thing.
good luck keep up the good work. :cool:
 
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BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
the panel with 1/3 shorted would be located in your living quarters where you want the heat. the 2 other panels would be outside. this requires no other components

So you use a PV panel as a resistor? I can't see any advantages to do that and it would be an expensive resistor...

Plus it would have a COP of 1 were I'll have a COP of around 4 thanks to the heatpump, so you would need a lot more panels and battery. Resistive heating is so inefficient it doesn't make sense to use it (excepted for power diversion for example).

NB: I'll have hydronic floors.


I am not sure where everyone(some people report incorrectly) keeps saying it takes larger gauge wire they are obviously wrong and mistaken. i have all panels wired with standard 10 gauge wire. i use PV red and PV black 10 gauge for easy color-coding. 10 gauge is the same wire use on almost all commercial PV solar panels. no big wire sizing required. I have read their incorrect quotations about the wire size and they are definitely wrong.

Let's take an example: 10 kW array with 350 V vs 10 kW array with 24 V.

At 350 V you need to transport 28.6 A, only one wire is enough to do that with say 3 % losses.

Now at 24 V you'll need to transport 416 A... so you'll need two 4/0 gauge wires at best or a bunch of smaller wires (essentially one per one or two panel(s)) to have the same 3 % losses. I'll let you compare the cost for a battery which is 50 feet from the panels for example... plus 4/0 wire (or a bunch of 10 AWG ones if you prefer) will be a PITA to route.


the advantage of dssr20 is no combiner boxes, no mppt's with short lives due to the capacitors. no high voltage to have to deal with special permits.

I'll not need combiner boxes. Capacitors are easily replaced. I'm off grid, I don't need permits.


just explaining how it (Electrodacus system)works. you decide what you build. there are 50 ways to accomplish the same thing.

I know how it works, and that's why I know it's not adapted for my case.


good luck keep up the good work. :cool:

Thanks, you too ;)
 

michael d

Solar Enthusiast
i have only 3 feet of 4/0 wire from the batter to the inverter positive busbar. so no real expense there. 10 gauge wire is 250 dollars per 1000 feet. shipped to me still cheap. I like your logic I plan on using resisitive wire and hydronic heated floors strictly off the excess solar pv electricity. dont need to buy someone else's high-dollar heat pump.. so savings there. .no heat pump required. only amall pump to move the water thru the tubes or no pump at all with resistive wire.
the solar panels i bought used for 45 dollars each plus 450 delivery i bought 2 pallets so 40 panels. specifically to match up to the sbms0 and dssr20.
all components must match up.I made my 10 amp wire runs less than 60 feet so no real losses there. the open circuit voltage runs about 39 volts then when i connect it to the lifepo4 batter it is more like 29 volts which the battery prefers.

i also have 327-watt mono-crystalline panels with a 48-volt system with expensive (500 dollar each) charge outback 80 amp solar charge controllers mppt. i think the electrodacus will be the better long term solution for all heat and electricity.
gotta go hook u[p 2 more panels - no wind today!
ii am not calculating any voltage drop as it is no significant issue in my 24-volt build.
the inverter 24 volts vs 48 volts are almost the same price. no real differences there.
i cant fix someone else's expensive heat pump.that new high tech heat pump technology is cool; but for me it is kiss principlal -- keep it simple st---.
i will continue my electrical studies -- a hobbly. thanks. :cool:
i am not in any way trying to be critical. i appreciate all information i receive and evaluate in all due time.
have a great day!:cool:
 

BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
10 gauge wire is 250 dollars per 1000 feet.

the solar panels i bought used for 45 dollars each plus 450 delivery i bought 2 pallets so 40 panels. specifically to match up to the sbms0 and dssr20.
all components must match up.I made my 10 amp wire runs less than 60 feet so no real losses there. the open circuit voltage runs about 39 volts then when i connect it to the lifepo4 batter it is more like 29 volts which the battery prefers.

So assuming 2x 60 feet of 10 AWG wire per panel that's 9600 feet of wire, so 2400 USD.

250 W and 29 V that's 8.62 A per panel; you have a Vdrop of 1.03 V and you're loosing 8.88 W which is 3.55 %.

If instead you group the panels by series of 10 you would need only 8x 60 feet of wire, so 480 feet for 120 USD.

You would have the same Vdrop of 1.03 V and power loss of 8.88 W but now in a 290 V and 2.5 kW string so only 0.36 % losses.

Savings on the wires alone (and you still need to add savings of not having the SBMS and DSSRs, connectors, breakers, etc...) are more than enough to cover the cost of two very nice MPPT SCCs.

So, for a lower price you now have a 10 times less losses in the wires, MPPT, less wires to route, ... I don't see how the SBMS solution is a better one.
 

michael d

Solar Enthusiast
no, your calculations are way off or at least misunderstood.
2 panels are in parallel at the array. the long runs (south-facing array)about 60 feet require 1 red PV 10 gauge and I black PV 10 gauge wire. so 120 feet that is for 2 panels. the short runs (west-facing array) are more like 30 feet so 60 feet of PV wire for 2 panels. if I put 24 panels in the big array that is 12 runs = 960 feet. and 16 panels short wire runs are 60 feet per 2 panels so 8 runs = 480 feet of PV wire. so I estimate 960 feet plus 480 feet of PV wire for 20 runs for 40 250-watt panels =1460 feet of 10 gauge PV wire or 730 feet of red PV wire and 730 feet of black PV wire 10 gauge. the wire cost $250 dollar delivered to my doorstep in 1000 feet rolls so I have less than $500 for PV wire. more like $375 dollars for the 1460 feet of PV wire (a bit less even).
Your wire calculation is 2400/375=6.4 is inflated 6.4 times over actual cost. you say 2400 dollars for wire that costs 375 dollars.

the excess solar PV will be used to heat the house directly thru solid-state relays (DSSR20 with diversion).

I liked the radiant floor heating idea and also have a superinsulated multi-story building (a different location) with many south-facing double pane windows to collect the solar sun in the winter designed for in-floor radiant heating. I think I will put the resistive or hydronic in-floor or underfloor heating in that also using the electricity from the sun. I believe solar energy is the way to go. I am trying to go off-grid sustainable in all new construction I do. DIY what you can do!

6 250 watt panels were putting out 1100 to 1200 watts in the sun yesterday on the 60 feet runs(1162.7 watts in the attached photo). the incoming voltage was 36volts from the 3rd set of 2 panels I hooked up yesterday. the 6 south-facing panels were charging the 24-volt battery at 41.898 amps. I had the DC light on in the insulated 8x8 foot power shed as the small load and maybe another light.
The solar panels are mounted at 45 degrees.
I still need to look at the voltage drop issue but the code says not important at less than 75 feet.
I have not calculated voltage drop on the 60 feet runs of 10 gauge PV wire from the solar panels to the DSSR20's; but it does not seem to stop the battery charging one bit.
maybe you can calculate that for me?
one solar panel is only $2340/40 = $58.50 so the delivered price to me was 58 dollars and 40 cents per 250watt solar panel.
the dssr20 cost $877.06 for 20 DSSR20's (4 of the DSSR20's have diversion so I can use for heating) and 1 SBMS0 (wifi version) and 2 DECT16 to control 40 250 watt solar panels (10,000-watt PV array).
the Electrodacus monitors watts and amps in 3 decimal places and balances the 24-volt 16cell 2P8S LiFePo4 battery while charging.
I bought the wifi version so I can view it on a larger screen. (not done with that part yet).

if I would have bought higher wattage 60 or 72 cell solar panels, then I could easily have a larger array(higher wattage). the SBMS0 will control up to 18,000 watts of solar power from the array. this build is 10,000 watts at this moment. :cool:
the panels weigh 41 pounds each so not an easy task to mount them. bigger panels weigh more and are more difficult to handle. These panels are 39 inches by 65 inches so 117 inches x 130 inches requires about a 10x12 foot mounting surface per 6 250 watt panels.
I built a 10-foot by 12-foot array mounting structure to fit 6 250 watt panes at a time.

the mppt solar charge controllers cost about 500 dollars each for outback flexmax 80 and will only control a few panels. I believe they would only control 6 of the 327-watt panels if I remember correctly. no savings there.
I needed at least 6 flexmax 80 for the 40 327 watt panels so no bargain there. I bought 4 of those. plus combiner boxes etc for that 48-volt system

the inverter prices are essentially the same whether it is 24 volt or 48 volts. wire to 24-volt inverter or wire to the 48-volt inverter is also essentially the same price.

with LiFePO4 you have to have a BMS. The SBMS0 is the BMS so you have to take that out of your price comparison as you will need some sort of BMS regardless. the SBMS0 cost 159 or less and is a very nice accurate BMS. I regularly check its output readings with my multimeters.
 

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BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
no, your calculations are way off or at least misunderstood.

They are based on the data you provided at the time (which was obviously incomplete and why I put the "assuming"). Of course if you have less wire length the the numbers will be lower.


I still need to look at the voltage drop issue but the code says not important at less than 75 feet.
I have not calculated voltage drop on the 60 feet runs of 10 gauge PV wire from the solar panels to the DSSR20's; but it does not seem to stop the battery charging one bit.
maybe you can calculate that for me?

It'll not prevent the battery from charging (unless it's a very big voltage drop of course) but it'll lower the efficiency.

1 wire for 2 panels so 500 W @ 29 V = 17.24 A with a voltage drop of 2.06 V or 7.11 %.

Used https://www.rapidtables.com/calc/wire/voltage-drop-calculator.html FIY ;)


the dssr20 cost $877.06 for 20 DSSR20's (4 of the DSSR20's have diversion so I can use for heating) and 1 SBMS0 (wifi version) and 2 DECT16 to control 40 250 watt solar panels (10,000-watt PV array).

Aouch; so yeah, that alone can pay for MPPT SCC.


the mppt solar charge controllers cost about 500 dollars each for outback flexmax 80 and will only control a few panels. I believe they would only control 6 of the 327-watt panels if I remember correctly. no savings there.

It'll handle a charge power of 2 kW on a 24 V battery and 4 kW on a 48 V battery (which you would use now as not limited by the 24 V limit of the SBMS anymore) and that's the charge power not the panel max power, you can over panel. Also, there's cheaper options.


with LiFePO4 you have to have a BMS. The SBMS0 is the BMS so you have to take that out of your price comparison as you will need some sort of BMS regardless. the SBMS0 cost 159 or less and is a very nice accurate BMS. I regularly check its output readings with my multimeters.

Yea, but you can't take the DSSRs cost out...

Oh, just remembered something: a BMS who isn't capable of interrupting current itself and instead rely on the other equipements to do it is too unsafe for me, so that alone is an instant no to using the SBMS for my system.

NB: not saying you shouldn't use it, it's your system, your money, etc... so it's your decision. And for my system my decision is the SBMS doesn't match my needs.

So, that will be my last post on that subject (getting tired of debating over something I'll not even use).
 

michael d

Solar Enthusiast
I still don't understand the voltage drop calculations. the 2 panels in parallel come into the DSSR20 at around 36 to 39 volts. this is on a 60 feet run.
each dssr20 cost about 37 Canadian dollars 91 Canadian dollar is currently .79 Us dollars so the DSSR20 is 37X.79=$29.23 to control 500 watts although that number could be larger with 72 cell panels @ say 320 watts each or more.
I am not debating what you should use or not use one way or another. sorry to bother you.
I see about 16 amps on 2 panels as the SBMS0 (BMS0 monitors and controls it so it does not overcharge the battery). when it hits the 24-volt lifepo4 battery it charges it with all of the amps that come thru it.
so to calculate and measure the actual voltage drop percentage of 60 feet of 10 gauge PV dc wire???? how much voltage drop I would need to measure the voltage right at the panel and the voltage at the Dssr20 to measure the voltage drop on the 60 feet run correct?
what do you think I should do--- post this question on the forum? to hopefully get an answer/explanation?
I will study up some more.
your attention has been appreciated.
thank you
yes, I agree the MPPT Outback solar charge controllers are way overpriced to control very few solar panels, as are the Victron, and midnight solar. so then you have to cheap out on some unknown unproved other branded ones.
the voltage you are talking about 350 dc volts is more than I care to play with. 24-volt and 48-volt dc system builds are plenty for this DIY person at this time.
the DSSR20's are shut off by the SBMS0. no current goes thru the SBMS0 to speak of.
 

BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
I still don't understand the voltage drop calculations. the 2 panels in parallel come into the DSSR20 at around 36 to 39 volts. this is on a 60 feet run.
each dssr20 cost about 37 Canadian dollars 91 Canadian dollar is currently .79 Us dollars so the DSSR20 is 37X.79=$29.23 to control 500 watts although that number could be larger with 72 cell panels @ say 320 watts each or more.
I am not debating what you should use or not use one way or another. sorry to bother you.
I see about 16 amps on 2 panels as the SBMS0 (BMS0 monitors and controls it so it does not overcharge the battery). when it hits the 24-volt lifepo4 battery it charges it with all of the amps that come thru it.
so to calculate and measure the actual voltage drop percentage of 60 feet of 10 gauge PV dc wire???? how much voltage drop I would need to measure the voltage right at the panel and the voltage at the Dssr20 to measure the voltage drop on the 60 feet run correct?
what do you think I should do--- post this question on the forum? to hopefully get an answer/explanation?
I will study up some more.
your attention has been appreciated.
thank you

You can calculate the wire resistance and then use Ohm's law or you can use a calculator who does it for you, like the one I linked above ;)

You just put the AWG, length (this calculator already calculate the round trip Vdrop, so you need to put 60 feet, not 120), voltage and current and it gives you what you want.

If you want more info then you need to ask the question in the proper forum category ;)


the DSSR20's are shut off by the SBMS0. no current goes thru the SBMS0 to speak of.

Current from the battery to the load isn't interrupted in case of a problem. With this design you can easily over discharge the battery while it's the BMS' job to prevent that in principle. And it doesn't protect against over current either.
 

michael d

Solar Enthusiast
You can calculate the wire resistance and then use Ohm's law or you can use a calculator who does it for you, like the one I linked above ;)

You just put the AWG, length (this calculator already calculate the round trip Vdrop, so you need to put 60 feet, not 120), voltage and current and it gives you what you want.

If you want more info then you need to ask the question in the proper forum category ;)




Current from the battery to the load isn't interrupted in case of a problem. With this design you can easily over discharge the battery while it's the BMS' job to prevent that in principle. And it doesn't protect against over current either.
I tried the calculator and you have to put in dc then it doubled the 30 feet or 60 feet and 60 and 120 feet respectively for 10 gauge PV wire and came up with 3 or 5 percent voltage drops respectively for the30 or 60 feet runs. thanks for that link. from lowes home improvement store. I started a new question on a proper thread about voltage drop. I am working to set up a spreadsheet to track all this efficiency vs cost etc.
good luck when you get your build done. I will be interested in what you settle with and how much it all costs.

my SBMS0 does protect against overvoltage it stops charging when overvoltage. the class t fuse protects the inverter and wire in case of battery issues. the 6000-watt LF PSW split phase inverter if functioning correctly shuts down before over-discharging also. I do not know how to prevent all catastrophes, but try to buy the best for the investment dollar. we get a 28 percent tax credit here in the USA so 10,000 dollars invested only cost 7200 dollars which helps the payback time tremendously.
cheers from pilgrimvalley -- South Dakota USA :cool:
 

KohalaJim

Solar Enthusiast
Yes, I even plan to have DC outlets besides the AC outlets because lots of devices can be run on DC easily...
Can you share what you're thinking here?
I'm wanting to add DC connectivity and wondering what you're considering for connection convention?
 

BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
Sure: As you probably discovered there's no standard for DC sockets in houses so I'm thinking about using either Anderson Powerpole connectors or Amphenol SP-4 connectors, here and here.

The Powerpole ones are more widespread but I currently favor the SP-4 ones as they are easier to plug/unplug, can handle a lot more mating cycles, have 4 pins in a compact package and are better at avoiding accidental contact with energised parts.

The 4 pins would allow me to have up to 3 different voltages; something like 48, 24 and 12 V, or 48, 12 and 5 V (which would probably be more useful given how many things use USB...).

There's also a power connector similar to the SP-4 and made by Amphenol too but it's a lot more expensive and the SP-4 is plenty enough for what I want to do (30 A max per pin, 130 V max).

And of course there's the IEC 60309 connectors but they have a pretty high insertion force (not ideal when your socket is mounted into drywall, mainly a EU problem, the US have crappier plugs but better mounting solutions for them...), are rather bulky (now I think about it I'm not even sure they would fit in our standard mounting boxes) and are pretty expensive. And despite the connectors following a standard for their shape, etc.. they don't have any electrical standard for low voltage DC applications (neither for voltage or polarity).
 

Maast

Compulsive Tinkerer
Looking at your required load I don't see how you can have enough panels without building another (rather large) structure to put them on, or if you have a good source of wind available. If you had a good flowing stream with 15 feet of drop you'd be golden.
From all the reading I've done on Home Power magazine its EXTREMELY difficult to do 100% solar off grid and store your own power, most do 80% and supplement with a generator or other charging source.
Net metering gives you another option if your locality allows it: Badly overproduce in the summer and bank a lot of credit with the power company and then use up that credit in the winter.
 

BiduleOhm

Electronics Sorcerer
Looking at your required load I don't see how you can have enough panels without building another (rather large) structure to put them on, or if you have a good source of wind available. If you had a good flowing stream with 15 feet of drop you'd be golden.

I have over estimated the needs by quite a bit (better safe than sorry...) so I need recalculate them more precisely and have a lower error margin. I also have underestimated the house isolation at the time (since then I was able to see what it looked like exactly and it's better than what I expected) and heating is the main load so that's a good sign.

Rough calculations tells me the SE and SW sides of the roof make a total of around 66 m² and that's the raw area, given they're not rectangles I'll some of it. So I think you're right, I'll need to add some panels somewhere else. Or plan to use a small generator a bit more than I'd like.

No wind available. And no water stream (I'd really liked that tho, it has been something I always wanted, but can't have everything...).


Net metering gives you another option if your locality allows it: Badly overproduce in the summer and bank a lot of credit with the power company and then use up that credit in the winter.

Well, it's complicated and a PITA to say the least, I'm not going to do that.
 

svetz

Works in theory! Practice? That's something else
Staff member
Moderator
The original premise was based on the reliability of the aerial wiring.

Now that you've been there a couple of years do you still feel the same way or would you change anything?

Also, as it's rural there, might there be enough natural waste wood that accumulates in a year that you could burn to augment your heating needs when there's not enough solar? Wood is still a renewable form of solar energy, trees are just prettier than panels, don't take up roof space, and sometimes your neighbors adore you for hauling it away. ;)
 

svetz

Works in theory! Practice? That's something else
Staff member
Moderator
Your remarks about not using net-metering previously got me to wondering about French / EU net-metering plans... from Wikipedia it sounds to good to be true:

... Électricité de France. According to their website, energy produced by home-owners is bought at a higher price than what is charged as consumers. Hence, some recommend to sell all energy produced, and buy back all energy needed at a lower price.

Can you clue us in on what's really happening?
 
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