Can the electrical grid handle a boom in electric vehicles?

LeoThomson

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The grid can't forever handle increasing demand for electricity. That is regardless if the demand is due to an increase in air conditioning requirements because of global warming and/or a switch to electric vehicles.

Both generation and the grid will have to expand, unless we reduce our energy consumption from the grid, through better insulation and/or rooftop solar. Whatever we do, there are costs associated and personally, I prefer a cleaner and quieter environment.

I see people argue that regulation for well insulated buildings and rooftop solar increases the cost of the home, but that increase would be most likely be offset by a reduction in cost in land and electricity prices. (house prices are for a large part limited by the amount of money people are able to borrow from the bank)
 

brb58

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NEpowerandlight

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So you show a picture of a coal mine!

Yes, you need some source of power for millions of EV's. I would say coal provides a large portion of energy used currently to charge up EV's.

When we get to 50% + efficiency on solar panels and affordable solid state batteries perhaps we can talk about adding millions of EV's to the grid as being a realistic expectation.

I've been working with the folks who build, maintain and run the local grid(s) for decades. I've worked at Limerick nuclear plant, coal burning and natural gas burning electric generating plants as well as solar farms. Those folks who work with local power grids don't share the sentiment expressed in these articles, papers about the current grid being able to handle EV's. They don't see the investment in updating and repairing the grid that politicians are claiming. My son inlaw is a master electrician who is currently taking classes on installing and maintaining EV chargers and other "green" technologies across the US. He told me that currently their are many places where a level 3 charger can not be installed because the grid can't handle it. A level 3 charger in every home will never happen even if people had the $50k required to get one.



None of these rosey estimates of the US power grid being able to deal with millions of EV's takes in to account the unprecedented number of people pouring in to the US and some European nations. The average US household consumes 877Kwh a month, multiply that by 100's of thousands or even millions of new households added yearly.
 

Ozark Tinkering

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A level 3 charger in every home will never happen even if people had the $50k required to get one.
I've been driving a plug-in ev since 2017 and am still using the level one charger that came with the car. I thought about getting a level 2 charger because my utility is offering to pay up to $250 to reimburse me and I could get one for that price, but I don't have the need and I'd have to change the outlet and breaker. Even a level 2 charger would give me most of a complete charge every night. Why would I need a level 3 charger? My level one charger only pulls 12amps at 120vac (maxed out). Not much of a concern for ENTERGY my utility provider, since they want me to upgrade and draw more not less and are willing to kick me $250 to get started. 🤷‍♂️
 

brb58

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Yes, you need some source of power for millions of EV's. I would say coal provides a large portion of energy used currently to charge up EV's.
Coal is currently 21.8% of total energy production. I guess that may be considered a large portion. California has the largest percentage of EVs at 38% compared to other states. CA uses no coal for power generation.

But even if coal was 100%, using coal for power generation for EVs, that is more green than an ICE engine which is between 20 and 30% efficient.
 

brb58

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I've been driving a plug-in ev since 2017 and am still using the level one charger that came with the car. I thought about getting a level 2 charger because my utility is offering to pay up to $250 to reimburse me and I could get one for that price, but I don't have the need and I'd have to change the outlet and breaker. Even a level 2 charger would give me most of a complete charge every night. Why would I need a level 3 charger? My level one charger only pulls 12amps at 120vac (maxed out). Not much of a concern for ENTERGY my utility provider, since they want me to upgrade and draw more not less and are willing to kick me $250 to get started. 🤷‍♂️
We have a Hyundai plug in hybrid. Our car can charge at 16A 240V for 30 miles in a little over 3 hours. When we are in town, we never need to buy gas.

We have many friends that have full electric vehicles. None would need anymore than a level 2 charger. Very few even charge their car every night.
 

bradbill

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I've been driving a plug-in ev since 2017 and am still using the level one charger that came with the car. I thought about getting a level 2 charger because my utility is offering to pay up to $250 to reimburse me and I could get one for that price, but I don't have the need and I'd have to change the outlet and breaker. Even a level 2 charger would give me most of a complete charge every night. Why would I need a level 3 charger? My level one charger only pulls 12amps at 120vac (maxed out). Not much of a concern for ENTERGY my utility provider, since they want me to upgrade and draw more not less and are willing to kick me $250 to get started. 🤷‍♂️
I own a Tesla S. I charge around once a week these days. If I do longer trips, maybe every other day. No need for more than a level 2 charger. Even if I wanted one, my 200A service won't be enough even for the smallest available level 3 charger. They are made for areas that need very fast charging...not homes.
 
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Ozark Tinkering

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I started with a used 2014 Volt to dip my toes in the ev waters then leased a 2020 Bolt 1LT. In April GM bought out the lease on our 2020 Bolt that still hadn't completed the traction battery recall and replaced it with a 2022 Bolt 2LT with the new battery. Other than for my zero turn mower I haven't bought gas since getting the first Bolt. I did fill the tank on my '99 F250 Powerstroke diesel the 1st week of March, about a week after Russia invaded Ukraine, but still have 1/4 tank left.
The closest I've ever been to using a public fast charger is to watch youtube videos. Right now my daughter drives a Honda Clarity which is a plug in hybrid. If she upgrades to a full electric then I will probably install a level 2 charger so when she and her husband come up they can recharge enough overnight to get back home the next day should it be a short visit.
 

Batvette

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I've been driving a plug-in ev since 2017 and am still using the level one charger that came with the car. I thought about getting a level 2 charger because my utility is offering to pay up to $250 to reimburse me and I could get one for that price, but I don't have the need and I'd have to change the outlet and breaker. Even a level 2 charger would give me most of a complete charge every night. Why would I need a level 3 charger? My level one charger only pulls 12amps at 120vac (maxed out). Not much of a concern for ENTERGY my utility provider, since they want me to upgrade and draw more not less and are willing to kick me $250 to get started. 🤷‍♂️

YOU'RE RETIRED.
 

grizzzman

Some say "Why" and some say "Why not?"
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Coal is currently 21.8% of total energy production. I guess that may be considered a large portion. California has the largest percentage of EVs at 38% compared to other states. CA uses no coal for power generation.

But even if coal was 100%, using coal for power generation for EVs, that is more green than an ICE engine which is between 20 and 30% efficient.
Ya they have bought coal power from out of state from as an example Utah.
 

Ozark Tinkering

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YOU'RE RETIRED.
You must be stalking me? That's elder abuse. You found me on the internet and found out I am retired. That's the only way you could have possibly known that private and very personal info about me. You've been reported to the AARP and SPCA just for good measure. I'm calling the bank and am going to have them cut you off and the fbi is liable to show up and take your cell phone at any moment. I can't believe the admin here allows this travesty to continue. Shesh.
 

LeoThomson

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If you are worried about electric cars disrupting the grid, you should have a look at how rooftop solar production is disrupting the grid and conventional electricity production. Rooftop solar is growing faster than electric cars and we will need to consume/store that energy locally. Charging your car from solar at home would of course be ideal as it would kill two birds with one stone.

Utility companies around the world are pushing for regulation and taxation to protect their business models, but in the end the free market will prevail and utility companies will either adapt to these new realities, or go bankrupt (and potentially be nationalized)

Interesting times...
 

Sanwizard

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Even imported power was less than 3% from coal...and that was 2020. By 2026, 0% will be from coal.

Everything cali is doing does not matter.
You will be sitting in your EV trying to charge during a rolling blackout, breathing the air coming over from China.

China is Currently Building Over Half of The World's New Coal-based Power Plants. In 2021, China began building 33 gigawatts of coal-based power generation, according to the Helsinki-based Center for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA).Jun 28, 2022
 

brb58

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Everything cali is doing does not matter.
You will be sitting in your EV trying to charge during a rolling blackout, breathing the air coming over from China.

China is Currently Building Over Half of The World's New Coal-based Power Plants. In 2021, China began building 33 gigawatts of coal-based power generation, according to the Helsinki-based Center for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA).Jun 28, 2022
Funny...I have never had a rolling blackout in any of my 3 houses here. I think I will survive.

Meanwhile, you will be in South Carolina with your major crime and medical care issues!
 

Sanwizard

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Funny...I have never had a rolling blackout in any of my 3 houses here. I think I will survive.

Meanwhile, you will be in South Carolina with your major crime and medical care issues!
Nah, not worried about crime. You are allowed to protect yourself here in this "Free" state. Tons of folks carry, so there is always a good guy with a gun around to take care of any perp.
 
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