Converting a barn into a workshop in Washington

Bobofresh

New Member
I have a new barn, it's about 800 to 1000 sq, but has high ceilings (probably up to 24 ft). I'm also in Western Washington, any suggestions on what to start out with for mild summers and winters, but lots of overcast?
 

iamrich

Solar Addict
What are your objectives for the workshop? I would think with ceilings that high, it would be better to ground mount panels. if you are not afraid of falling to your death, a roof that high would be great for lots of panels, but maintenance and troubleshooting would suck.
 

Hedges

Photon Sorcerer
Do you need the headroom, for tall equipment or material?
An insulated ceiling would make climate control easier.
A 2nd floor would double usable floor area.

As for PV, overcast can mean 10% or 1% as much production, depending on how thick.
Either make sawdust while the sun shines, or get a large battery.
This is assuming PV is your primary power source, vs. if hydro is available.

There are fall-stop harnesses for working on roofs. Our training said you can die while dangling if there isn't help and a plan to get you back down on the ground.
I'm considering a cable strung along the ridge with pulley, so instead of being limited to an arc about a single anchor point I can have a more rectangular area available (not extending beyond the eaves.)
Of course, I'm still just considering. I bought a fall-stop but haven't hooked it up yet, and simply walk on roof when I need to (weather permitting.)
 

OffGridInTheCity

Solar Enthusiast
I have a new barn, it's about 800 to 1000 sq, but has high ceilings (probably up to 24 ft). I'm also in Western Washington, any suggestions on what to start out with for mild summers and winters, but lots of overcast?
Maybe start with something like PVWatts - https://pvwatts.nrel.gov/pvwatts.php - and type in some various PV sizes (no of panels you plan) and see what kind of power you have available.

To heat-pump heat/cool 1000sq ft with good insulation is variable but maybe around 300-400kwh/month type of thing (based on my own experience in Southern Oregon / mild-climate) - you can probably get some estimates from someone or an installer.

Then compare the PV amount with some numbers and you may go ... its 'in range' or you may go 'no way' :)
 
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