Crypto Currency Mining a Giant Pyramid Scheme?

Short_Shot

Photon Sorcerer
In
What do you guys do when you just pull in from work, and the battery is just about dead, and then your wife screams "the baby is coming!". ? Ambulance I guess right?

I am asking cause I want to buy an EV, but have some concerns about long distance vacations( how many charging stations available in the desert?) And emergency situations. How do you guys handle that?
You'd do the same thing you'd do if you pulled in the driveway on E.

Plan ahead to avoid it.
 

time2roll

Photon Sorcerer
What do you guys do when you just pull in from work, and the battery is just about dead, and then your wife screams "the baby is coming!". ? Ambulance I guess right?

I am asking cause I want to buy an EV, but have some concerns about long distance vacations( how many charging stations available in the desert?) And emergency situations. How do you guys handle that?
My first EV was a LEAF and this was a genuine concern due to the 80-90 mile range. DW has and still has a gasoline vehicle. However once the EV was in the garage the gasser saw less and less miles. Once you have decent range of 200+ miles this really falls away as a concern. You will get home with plenty of range unless you are way out someplace.

Long distance vacations I try to fly. Have driven a gasser 750 miles in a day and it is a real chore. Would take two day minimum for me in an EV. One level 3 charge for an hour would be enough to call it the day for me. So a 300 mile range car maybe 450 miles max per day. The country is well covered in fast charging except for a couple spots and they should be covered soon. Very close to having charging up to Alaska at this point. Gets a bit slim though Montana/Dakotas and a dark patch up 93 from Vegas to Twin Falls.

https://www.plugshare.com/widget.html
 

Sanwizard

Photon Sorcerer
My first EV was a LEAF and this was a genuine concern due to the 80-90 mile range. DW has and still has a gasoline vehicle. However once the EV was in the garage the gasser saw less and less miles. Once you have decent range of 200+ miles this really falls away as a concern. You will get home with plenty of range unless you are way out someplace.

Long distance vacations I try to fly. Have driven a gasser 750 miles in a day and it is a real chore. Would take two day minimum for me in an EV. One level 3 charge for an hour would be enough to call it the day for me. So a 300 mile range car maybe 450 miles max per day. The country is well covered in fast charging except for a couple spots and they should be covered soon. Very close to having charging up to Alaska at this point. Gets a bit slim though Montana/Dakotas and a dark patch up 93 from Vegas to Twin Falls.

https://www.plugshare.com/widget.html
I like to use a van to pile in the kids and get lost in America. Our vacations are like exporations, we have no plans, and no destination. We end up on all the back roads visiting the small towns that gat passed by. We actually met the mayor of a small town in Kansas, who came over to say hi, cause they dont often see strangers, and yes, her name was Dorothy. Been all through Montana, mountains in Colorado, coastal highways, plains states, monument valley, grand canyon, etc. I dont remember seeing a single charging station. Maybe I was just not looking. Do they even make EV vans that can go long distance?
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
What do you guys do when you just pull in from work, and the battery is just about dead, and then your wife screams "the baby is coming!". ? Ambulance I guess right?

I am asking cause I want to buy an EV, but have some concerns about long distance vacations( how many charging stations available in the desert?) And emergency situations. How do you guys handle that?

Hybrid, baby!

iu
 

time2roll

Photon Sorcerer
I like to use a van to pile in the kids and get lost in America. Our vacations are like exporations, we have no plans, and no destination. We end up on all the back roads visiting the small towns that gat passed by. We actually met the mayor of a small town in Kansas, who came over to say hi, cause they dont often see strangers, and yes, her name was Dorothy. Been all through Montana, mountains in Colorado, coastal highways, plains states, monument valley, grand canyon, etc. I dont remember seeing a single charging station. Maybe I was just not looking. Do they even make EV vans that can go long distance?
Rivian SUV would be the only thing close to practical in this situation. Only goes 300 miles between charges and should work well with some planning. Supposed to eventually have a 400 mile version that would be even better. If you are towing the range is probably half. The gasser is not exactly obsolete yet for what you describe.

And yes I do similar with an old F150 pulling a small fifth wheel. Range is a solid 175 miles but plenty of fuel in most places.

https://rivian.com/r1s
 

robby

Solar Addict
Way too much liability involved in swapping a used battery pack into a random person's car.

Not a new idea by any means and some systems have even been tested iirc, but not a good solution.
I think your using too much of today's thinking in dealing with a solution that is 15 years away.
In 15 years I doubt that people will be all that interested in how many more charges a pack has left in it. Ultimately a half assed pack ends up at the New EV Gas Stations where it does not pass the tests during charging and they then directly deal with the manufacturer if it's under warranty, if not it's written off by insurance or possibly dealt with under some kind of agreements with the manufactures.

I also like @Lt.Dan idea. A battery of the future might not be owned by the vehicle owner but instead belong to the automaker or battery maker who in turn makes money on a cut from the charging stations. Battery price will probably be 20% of what they are now, so it won't be difficult to see this as a cash cow for Battery makers.

I love this conversation because it's a real world problem that is going to be dealt with one way or the other.

I think that Home charging of batteries may be taken off the table at some point in the future due to the possibility that it can always take down the Grid in an instant! Remember we are talking about a future America where 80% of the Vehicles are EV's.
It is very possible that during a hot summer with a storm coming towards Florida or some other state that you will have millions of EV's being plugged in the day before and over loading the Grid. The scenarios gets even wider as Oil prices will not be as big of an issue as Energy prices. So even the rumblings of an increase in electricity cost could cause millions of EV's in every city to be put on charge 15 minutes after the news breaks at night.

With vulnerabilities like this it would make sense that the Government has to have a way to control how many Vehicles are charged at any point in time. Also to go green with current tech you really want to remove and stock pile batteries so that they can be charged by Solar and Wind Power. So a one battery pack for each car scenerio would not be practical, their would have to always be a big surplus of batteries in the system.
 

robby

Solar Addict
What do you guys do when you just pull in from work, and the battery is just about dead, and then your wife screams "the baby is coming!". ? Ambulance I guess right?

I am asking cause I want to buy an EV, but have some concerns about long distance vacations( how many charging stations available in the desert?) And emergency situations. How do you guys handle that?
Yeah I have the same concerns and I also like to hear my engine revving up !!
Several of my Gear head friends have bought Tesla's after test driving them. I am not really looking forward to switching as I am at the point in my life where I don't get thrilled by huge changes in the way I am use to doing things but I acknowledge that EV's must be vastly superior in every way because my fellow Gear Heads have abandoned their other Cars for EV's.
I gave up stick shift just about 6 years ago, so that gives you an idea of how stubborn I am when it comes to my vehicles.
 

Sanwizard

Photon Sorcerer
Yeah I have the same concerns and I also like to hear my engine revving up !!
Several of my Gear head friends have bought Tesla's after test driving them. I am not really looking forward to switching as I am at the point in my life where I don't get thrilled by huge changes in the way I am use to doing things but I acknowledge that EV's must be vastly superior in every way because my fellow Gear Heads have abandoned their other Cars for EV's.
I gave up stick shift just about 6 years ago, so that gives you an idea of how stubborn I am when it comes to my vehicles.
I just sought out a stick shift for my latest car. Screw those rubber band CVT transmissions. Gears or nothing. Mine is all wheel drive also. It goes uphill at 40 degree incline with 12 inches of snow.
Believe it or not though, I saw a vid of an electric truck that has a motor on each wheel, and it climbes hills like crazy! So things are getting interesting.
 

Sanwizard

Photon Sorcerer
I just sought out a stick shift for my latest car. Screw those rubber band CVT transmissions. Gears or nothing. Mine is all wheel drive also. It goes uphill at 40 degree incline with 12 inches of snow.
Believe it or not though, I saw a vid of an electric truck that has a motor on each wheel, and it climbes hills like crazy! So things are getting interesting.
 

Lt.Dan

Photon Sorcerer
I've been up Hells Revenge in several vehicles! Its no joke! And for that thing to do it with highway tires 🤣🤣
 

Short_Shot

Photon Sorcerer
I think your using too much of today's thinking in dealing with a solution that is 15 years away.
In 15 years I doubt that people will be all that interested in how many more charges a pack has left in it. Ultimately a half assed pack ends up at the New EV Gas Stations where it does not pass the tests during charging and they then directly deal with the manufacturer if it's under warranty, if not it's written off by insurance or possibly dealt with under some kind of agreements with the manufactures.

I also like @Lt.Dan idea. A battery of the future might not be owned by the vehicle owner but instead belong to the automaker or battery maker who in turn makes money on a cut from the charging stations. Battery price will probably be 20% of what they are now, so it won't be difficult to see this as a cash cow for Battery makers.

I love this conversation because it's a real world problem that is going to be dealt with one way or the other.

I think that Home charging of batteries may be taken off the table at some point in the future due to the possibility that it can always take down the Grid in an instant! Remember we are talking about a future America where 80% of the Vehicles are EV's.
It is very possible that during a hot summer with a storm coming towards Florida or some other state that you will have millions of EV's being plugged in the day before and over loading the Grid. The scenarios gets even wider as Oil prices will not be as big of an issue as Energy prices. So even the rumblings of an increase in electricity cost could cause millions of EV's in every city to be put on charge 15 minutes after the news breaks at night.

With vulnerabilities like this it would make sense that the Government has to have a way to control how many Vehicles are charged at any point in time. Also to go green with current tech you really want to remove and stock pile batteries so that they can be charged by Solar and Wind Power. So a one battery pack for each car scenerio would not be practical, their would have to always be a big surplus of batteries in the system.
And I think you're forgetting that history has always shown that people get far more litigious over time and not less, as new laws and more lawyers join the force every day.

It isn't about how many charges are left, but rather the physical condition leading to failures, damage, or other destruction.

Even if a new chemistry is used that's utterly safe on paper, if any fault occurs that even so much as causes a trip to a repair shop the customer will hold the company liable wherever possible.
 
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