DEYE Inverter UL Listed available in US

robby

Solar Enthusiast
You are correct. I did reach out to the Sol-Ark team and they did mention the dongle for off grid use for $100 and that not having the internet connected will not void the warranty. They did confirm Wi-fi can be disabled by removing the Wi-fi dongle. That is very good news. Wi-fi and networks are a potential security issue for me.

After getting this confirmation, I am much more inclined to choose the Sol Ark than after I read some of the negative assertions about Sol-Ark in this thread. It seems like some of the security issues have been addressed, I don't see any reliability issues so far as they seem to have a good reputation thus far from the solar community, and even the issue about continuous output ratings seems to have been addressed (that they likely will produce 9k continuous under very specific circumstances) just know more like 7-8k real world.

As far as choosing Sol Ark over Dye, I would personally have an ethical issue of knowingly purchasing something that is in violation of trade agreements and using someone else's intellectual property, especially since the parties involved are an American company vs a Communist one. In addition, there are other factors such as the added warranty, support, additional breakers/features as well as the optional EMP protection. Finally, when building a total system that may cost $15-$30k does saving a few grand on inverters make a big difference? Perhaps for some, but factoring in the IRS rebates, I don't think it's worth it financially.

I just wanted to address a few other assertions regarding EMP protection. Some say the EMP doesn't do anything or that it only protects 120v circuits etc. Sol Ark clarified for me that the EMP is MILSPEC tested and they also offer EMP panels and they do protect 240v. This is a value to me since every so often we have severe lighting storms that take out key appliances.


SMA would be my second choice but there is more cost.
Glad to hear it is all working out for you. I also went through a long period of time trying to nail down which Inverter to buy. SMA was also first on my list but once I started looking at what was needed to get a true 240V Hybrid system installed in an island configuration it became less appealing, not only because of super high price but also because it would require so much more equipment and space to achieve the same thing the Sol-Ark was doing in a single unit.

The Intellectually property rip off that happens in China is really bad. It's a no win situation for most US companies as they just cannot get PCB's and equipment made anywhere else at a competitive price point but the downside is that your basically handing them the blue prints and firmware for your technology. I think the relationship with DEYE was very typical of what I have witnessed in the industry as an EE.

It starts out as a mutual agreement that yes you can copy our stuff and sell it in mainland China and that is the price you pay if you want to do business in China and your a small company. Unfortunately that agreement soon gets disregarded and they start to export the cloned product to more and more countries and literally tell you that you can either except it or go jump off a cliff. I guess Sol-Ark is not accepting it, as they are building a factory in the USA.
 
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Hedges

Photon Sorcerer
POCO's in California require grid-tied inverters installed after mid-2020 to have communications capability for smart inverter functions (e.g. set active power output).

I see what you mean. Ability to change control parameters remotely so system responds differently, in case grid stability isn't behaving as intended.

Presentation by EnPhase:

Can you imagine designing and deploying a control system, without ever testing it in final configuration (adding distributed loads and generation in the future, in this case)?

My older stuff is grandfathered and since it is battery-backup can disconnect to operate as an island.
Future expansion (as opposed to simply replacing failed inverters) would require new compliant equipment, if exporting more.
Anything buffered behind peak-shaving battery backup would avoid that. I use (limited cycle life) AGM now, but lithium would enable exporting additional kWh well beyond daylight hours. Useful if I want to save more power for off-season.

Improving grid support with our personal battery systems is another concept, apparently not mandated at this time. (Impact of storage is briefly mentioned in that presentation.)
 

the_colorist

"Move over... let me fix it"
Future expansion (as opposed to simply replacing failed inverters) would require new compliant equipment, if exporting more.
I need to check with SMA on this but I'm pondering if more use cases can be met (grid-zero) with the Data Manager M + Com Gateway + Energy Meter for previous gen equipment.

*************

I shouldn't really comment on it more than this but the licensing with Deye is perhaps not exactly as it seems or at least not what it probably seems to most. They actually have a few fully licensed agents for the hybrid inverters in the USA. Two of them are:

SOL-ARK
Lion Energy Sanctuary
 
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Hedges

Photon Sorcerer
I need to check with SMA on this but I'm pondering if more use cases can be met can be met (grid-zero) with the Data Manager M + Com Gateway + Energy Meter for previous gen equipment.

Hey, do you know if Sunny Boy Storage works on an island grid formed by Sunny Island?
I saw that it is UL 1741SA, does frequency-watts (throttling down output power with increased frequency.)
But I would want it to also ramp charging of battery up and down.

My idea is, Sunny Island (23kW rated) keeps an AGM battery floated and uses it for surge currents. Sunny Boy Storage (6kW) stores power in lithium.

Thanks!
 

solar8484

Solar Enthusiast
actually, that series of inverter's ip laye with a british company called sunsynk, no ip theft here.

sure sol-ark made improvement as did deye..

So, Sol-Ark licensed directly from Sunsynk? Or directly from Deye and Deye licensed directly from Sunsynk?

Is there a list of actual functional (i.e. not packaging) differences between Sol-Ark and Deye?
 

solar8484

Solar Enthusiast
I shouldn't really comment on it more than this but the licensing with Deye is perhaps not exactly as it seems or at least not what it probably seems to most. They actually have a few fully licensed agents for the hybrid inverters in the USA. Two of them are:

SOL-ARK
Lion Energy Sanctuary

So Sol-Ark licensed from Deye. I am biased but I've always thought the UI look and feel was subpar for it to be designed by an American company.
 

UncleJimmy

Head for the hills.
So Sol-Ark licensed from Deye. I am biased but I've always thought the UI look and feel was subpar for it to be designed by an American company.
I think it is the opposite: Deye licensed from Sol--Ark and are violating their agreement when selling to U.S. market.

I believe a substantial part of this thread addressed this. Although, I guess it depends on who you believe.
 

houseofancients

New Member
I think it is the opposite: Deye licensed from Sol--Ark and are violating their agreement when selling to U.S. market.

I believe a substantial part of this thread addressed this. Although, I guess it depends on who you believe.
i believe both sol-ark and deye licenced it from sunsynk, all three companies working on it, and given access to tailor to the specific UI needs of their markets.
all 3 UI have a somewhat different look
add to this mpp solar that will start selling upon the same platform, and you have a pretty sturdy development base
 

UncleJimmy

Head for the hills.
i believe both sol-ark and deye licenced it from sunsynk, all three companies working on it, and given access to tailor to the specific UI needs of their markets.
all 3 UI have a somewhat different look
add to this mpp solar that will start selling upon the same platform, and you have a pretty sturdy development base
What evidence to you have to support this claim outside that the units appear to share, to a greater or lesser degree, some design elements?

Admittedly not 100% conclusive, but here are the points that support mine:

  • Sol-Ark's response to this thread located in the thread
  • according to reports, Chinese vendors basically admitting they are not allowed to sell into this market
  • the knowledge of how the Chinese seem to coerce foreign investment with regard to their intellectual property
 

houseofancients

New Member
What evidence to you have to support this claim outside that the units appear to share, to a greater or lesser degree, some design elements?

Admittedly not 100% conclusive, but here are the points that support mine:

  • Sol-Ark's response to this thread located in the thread
  • according to reports, Chinese vendors basically admitting they are not allowed to sell into this market
  • the knowledge of how the Chinese seem to coerce foreign investment with regard to their intellectual property
so basically you "proof" is fed by your dislike of the chinese ?
who holds the IP ?
bothered to check ?
 

copec

New Member
I would absolutely love a Sol-Ark, but don't make enough money to justify it, although I have only heard good things about it and their support. When/If I make more money in the future I'll buy Sol-Ark.

I already have a Growatt 12000t that can start everything in my house (including the AC) that I have been using, but I'm going to relegate it to a UPS with only a few panels and put a Deye 8k in front of it. That way I could literally run everything at the same time in off-grid mode if I had the desire (right now I can't run the AC and Drier at the same time in off-grid mode during the day, which the wife forgets sometimes).

I'll have it setup now as grid -> Growatt -> panel with everything, and I'm going to set it up grid -> Growatt --Deye CT clamps-> panel with drier, AC condenser, range outlet -> Deye 8k -> everything else under backup load. Then I'll set the Growatt shutdown voltage relatively high or even put it on its own battery.
 

UncleJimmy

Head for the hills.
I found some info from Sol-Ark that I think clarifies the max continuous power rating that some brought up earlier in this thread.

The Sol-Ark 12K label actually shows 8K Charger, 9K split-phase inverter. I believe what the Sol-Ark engineer is explaining is that Max Continuous AC is 9K for grid-tied and 8K off-grid.

 
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