Gloves?

TheDroidsYouAreLookingFor

Solar Enthusiast
So I plan to be safe with all things electric anyways but I regularly wear 10 mil black gloves when working on cars, boats ect. so i don't get oil stained hands. they are regular vinyl powder free gloves that are pretty thick. I was planning on wearing them while assembling components then had 2 thoughts.

1. Would they provide any insulating properties?
2. If my hands sweat inside them would it make me MORE conductive?

I would hate to make things worse just by wearing what I always wear for other projects... Any advice or speculation would be great.
 
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DThames

Photon Sorcerer
For cases where it is required to work on hot circuits they do make "special" gloves for that. I would not trust anything that is not rated and then I still would make it a practice to trust a film type barrier. I work to avoid being grounded and avoid touching a circuit other than just one hand. If you do those two things you can avoid most serious mishaps.
 

FilterGuy

What, me worry?
So I plan to be safe with all things electric anyways but I regularly wear 10 mil black gloves when working on cars, boars ect. so i don't get oil stained hands. they are regular vinyl powder free gloves that are pretty thick. I was planning on wearing them while assembling components then had 2 thoughts.

1. Would they provide any insulating properties?
2. If my hands sweat inside them would it make me MORE conductive?

I would hate to make things worse just by wearing what I always wear for other projects... Any advice or speculation would be great.

I assume these are some kind of plastic gloves? If so, they should add some insulating protection.
I don't think the sweat would make you any more conductive.... but if the gloves get a tear in them, it is possible the sweat could make things worse.

I have never used them, but there are gloves that are made specifically for electrical isolation.
 

upnorthandpersonal

Administrator
Your points 1 and 2 are actually not the core of the issue: don't wear vinyl, nitrile or other disposable thin-ish gloves when working on electrical installations. If you get a burn, they'll melt into your skin, never mind that they tear and offer little protection for that kind of work (tears, cuts, pokes, ...). Find something similar to this: https://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Gloves-Nitrile-Electrical-Safety/dp/B01C2LR6KQ or search for electrical safety gloves.
 

TheDroidsYouAreLookingFor

Solar Enthusiast
Very true on all accounts, I was thinking its just nice to have a barrier for dirt/grease ect. I just wont wear them if it will be an issue, I did read a few experiments where they do provide current protection for defibrillators as long as there is no puncture. Defibrillators have high voltage low amperage so its not going to jump through the glove. Also human body is around 500 ohms so at that point burns would in fact be the worst thing that could happen. It also seems very unlikely that your glove will be subjected to that kind of heat. If your glove is melting on your skin you have bigger problems! 🧯 The point about getting poked or torn is a real one and sweaty hands I guess would make you more conductive. For me it will be NO GLOVES since it really doesn't seem to matter but could be potentially worse. Thank you for the replies I really appreciate it.

I found some interesting information on my own on the OSHA site. Previous work with bucket and scissor lifts reminded me that these guys have a regulation for everything.

The minimum approach distance (MAD; in meters) shall conform to the following equations. For phase-to-phase system voltages of 50 V to 300 V: 1 : MAD = avoid contact



1926.960(k)(2)
The employer shall ensure that devices used by employees to close circuits under load conditions are designed to safely carry the current involved.
Table V-2 - AC Live-Line Work Minimum Approach Distance
The minimum approach distance (MAD; in meters) shall comform to the following equations.
For phase-to-phase system voltages of 50 V to 300 V: 1
MAD = avoid contact
For phase-to-phase system voltages of 301 V to 5kV: 1
MAD = M + D, where
D = 0.02 mthe electrical component of the minimum approach distance
M = 0.31 m for voltages up to 750V and 0.61 m otherwisethe inadvertent movement factor
For phase-to-phase system voltages of 5.1 kV to 72.5V: 1,4
MAD = M + AD, where
M = 0.61 mthe inadvertent movement factor
A = the applicable value from Table V-4the altitude correction factor
D = the value from Table V-3 corresponding to the voltage and exposure or the value of the electrical component of the minimum approach distance calculated using the method provided in Appendix B to this subpartthe electrical component of the minimum approach distance
For phase-to-phase system voltages of more than 72.5 kV, nominal: 2, 4
MAD = 0.3048(C+a)VL-GTA+M , where
C=0.01 for phase-to-ground exposures that the employer can demonstrate consist only of air across the approach distance (gap),
0.01 for phase-to-phase exposures if the employer can demonstrate that no insulated tool spans the gap and the no large conductive object is in the gap, or
0.011 otherwise
VL-G =phase-to-ground rms voltage, in kV
T =maximum anticipated per-unit transient overvoltage; for phase-to-ground exposures, T equals TL-G, the maximum per-unit transient overvoltage, phase-to-ground, determined by the employer under paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section; for phase-to-phase exposures, T equals 1.35TL-G+0.45
A =altitude correction factor from Table V-4
M =0.31 m, the inadvertent movement factor
a =saturation factor, as follows:
Phase-to-Ground Exposure
VPeak = TL-GVL-G√2635 kV or less635.1 to 915 kV915.1 to 1,050 kVMore than 1,050 kV
a0(VPeak-635)/140,000(VPeak-645)/135,000(VPeak-675)/125,000
Phase-to-Ground Exposure3
VPeak=(1.35TL-G+0.45)VL-g√2630 kV or less630.1 to 848 kV848.1 to 1,131 kV1,131.1 to 1,485 kVMore than 1,485 kV
a0(VPeak-630)/155,000(VPeak-633.6)/152,207(VPeak-628)/153,846(VPeak-350.5)/203,666


Here is the page:
 

DThames

Photon Sorcerer
Your points 1 and 2 are actually not the core of the issue: don't wear vinyl, nitrile or other disposable thin-ish gloves when working on electrical installations. If you get a burn, they'll melt into your skin, never mind that they tear and offer little protection for that kind of work (tears, cuts, pokes, ...). Find something similar to this: https://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Gloves-Nitrile-Electrical-Safety/dp/B01C2LR6KQ or search for electrical safety gloves.
I was testing a special motor with a 3 pole double throw switch that was connected to a cluster of leads with electrical tape wrapped around the switch. The switch would reverse the motor rotation without stopping the motor (powered reverse). The amps overwhelmed the switch and it did one of those blue electrical fireballs while I was holding it in my hand. It burned a little but caused me great concern because I could not feel much pain. I had heard really bad burns are not as painful (at first) because the nerves are burned. I had a numb feeling on all of the black areas. Went to the doctor......3 days later it started getting a lot better as the black started pealing off. The tape had vaporized and condensed on my skin, like a plastic coating. The burns were not even blister burns, just red. The layer of tape messed with the way things felt on my skin, sort of numb. Yes keep the plastic out of the line of fire.
 
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