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Grounding PV

Inverter grounding with Grid/Shorepower

The purpose of the ground is to provide a path for the hot-wire to short to so it can trip the fuse (rather than short through you).
So the ground should go back to the source of power generation that has the fuse/breaker.

When the inverter is using the grid, the ground should be to the grid's ground. When you're in inverter mode you want the ground to go to the inverter's ground so the inverter can trip the circuit. In a vehicle, the inverter's ground typically goes to the vehicle frame, so if the AC hot wire touches the frame it'll trip the circuit.
 
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Driving those copper ground rods a pain in the @##? ? Just saw this video and this method makes it look easy?

 
Or you can use a ground rod driver. No ladder needed.
 
Here is a well done discussion of grounding, really well done.

Thank you! Now I understand that a ground wire is simply on standby to prevent a short circuit from unleashing damage on the system. A ground wire will either return the surge of electrical current back to the system through contact with both the surroundings and system, OR a ground wire will send excess current into a large volume of neutral matter that can then dissipate the current (the earth, or a big metal vehicle body)
 
Thank you! Now I understand that a ground wire is simply on standby to prevent a short circuit from unleashing damage on the system. A ground wire will either return the surge of electrical current back to the system through contact with both the surroundings and system, OR a ground wire will send excess current into a large volume of neutral matter that can then dissipate the current (the earth, or a big metal vehicle body)
I took a look at that video. The first half is correct in the way the ground provides safety and causes circuit breakers to open. The second part about earth ground is just complete bullshit.
 
I took a look at that video. The first half is correct in the way the ground provides safety and causes circuit breakers to open. The second part about earth ground is just complete bullshit.
Are you talking about 4:20 to 5:30 (earth ground), 5:30 to 6:30 (bleeding of static charges), or both? Not an expert, but I didn't see anything specifically wrong with them. What did you object to?
 
Are you talking about 4:20 to 5:30 (earth ground), 5:30 to 6:30 (bleeding of static charges), or both? Not an expert, but I didn't see anything specifically wrong with them. What did you object to?
4:20 to 5:30 earth ground is the part I am talking about. The part I object to is the whole concept of charging the earth.
 
We are in the process of installing the new system.
This warning label was on the charge controller PV connection terminal.
DSC00098.JPG
I am going to have to figure this out, as we get lots of lightning here.
I know nothing can help a direct strike, but there are enough nearby strikes to induce voltage/current into the PV system, ground mounted.
I ordered a Midnite Solar MNSPD-600 > 600 Volt Surge Protection Device for the PV system, and it will need a local ground.
The PV array is over 100 ft from the building where the electronics are located.
I have used Motorola R56 designs and procedures to protect my HAM radio antennas and equipment, works great.
We will see if the new system survives the first Summer!
 
4:20 to 5:30 earth ground is the part I am talking about. The part I object to is the whole concept of charging the earth.
Nothing we know charges the earth, the earth is an overall neutral and impure mass. I appreciate the video for giving me a sense of perspective, we simply rely on a thick impure mass like a vehicle chassis, or the earth as a place where any significant amount of charge or current will dissipate into a less harmful amount of charge. After some time, the charge returns to neutral in an impure mass.
 
Thank you! Now I understand that a ground wire is simply on standby to prevent a short circuit from unleashing damage on the system. A ground wire will either return the surge of electrical current back to the system through contact with both the surroundings and system, OR a ground wire will send excess current into a large volume of neutral matter that can then dissipate the current (the earth, or a big metal vehicle body)
20210328_131841.jpg
Here is a photo of my AC Converter (aka "shore charger", aka "battery charger") it has a ground terminal that is literally just some terminal hardware clipped firmly to the metal body that contains the entire component. A grounding wire simply provides a backdoor for excessive current to flow somewhere safe during a short circuit incident. Ima ground it to the negative bus bar on my fuse box ?
 
Inverter grounding with Grid/Shorepower

The purpose of the ground is to provide a path for the hot-wire to short to so it can trip the fuse (rather than short through you).
So the ground should go back to the source of power generation that has the fuse/breaker.

When the inverter is using the grid, the ground should be to the grid's ground. When you're in inverter mode you want the ground to go to the inverter's ground so the inverter can trip the circuit. In a vehicle, the inverter's ground typically goes to the vehicle frame, so if the AC hot wire touches the frame it'll trip the circuit.
20210328_131841.jpg
?agreed, this is a photo of a grounding terminal on one of my components. It's just a piece of terminal hardware clipped firmly to the metal housing of the component. Im gonna wire it to my negative bus bar on my fuse box
 
In looking at this for number of years, the sources I look at indicate that the earth is negatively charged. As one moves away from the earth's surface the charge becomes more positive.

I have experienced this firsthand through a concept known as earthing. It is commonly discussed in physics forums as well.

One challenge is that improperly wired "main boxes or circuits in the home" will route current into the water lines in the area. If one were to run a meter on the water pipes in the home, it is common to find a current or a magnetic field. One cause might be neutrals which were mixed in junction boxes in the home.

This is one of the reasons it is suggested to put a diaelectric junction a distance from the home, which could still allow the ground into the soil on the way to the main connection but not allow current to flow back into the home. This should be done by a professional however so one does not defeat the house ground and risk harm to occupants.

I am not an electrician, but have encountered this in research on another topic.
 
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