Inverter In RV Not Grounded?

12VoltInstalls

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No. GFCI compares the current moving through hot and neutral. It doesn't depend on the green ground circuit.
So you made me look.
I’ve used a tester for years (cuz code inspectors when I was an apartment manager wouldn’t accept the ‘test’ button) and I noticed the tester “failed” without the bare. Plus they have that little notice about the ground.
And so just now I learned this:
“GFCI works fine on a 2-wire circuit, it’s just your typical tester that won’t work. The tester needs a ground to be able to simulate a leak to cause it to trip. It will still trip if there is an actual current leak or if you use the device test button which does not require a ground to work.”

Either way I guess I didnt realize the tester did differently and assumed the inspector was being picky?

Thank you
 
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efficientPV

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I remember a house I bought. In the basement there was a six inch piece of pipe with a clamp around it just floating in the air, hanging from a wire. Big yellow tag on the wire said, Do not remove this ground connection from pipe. They didn't. That is what you call a floating ground.
 

12VoltInstalls

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remember a house I bought. In the basement there was a six inch piece of pipe with a clamp around it just floating in the air, hanging from a wire
I remember a kitchen sink in a customer’s house. Had to sweat on some valves. Water was off. There was a ~10ga piece of solid copper wire clamped to the cold pipe. When I disconnected the hot water side I got a good jolt and a huge brute yellow/blue arc. I don’t where it got it’s energy from but there was a path to that clamp.
 

jesfl

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Again, thank you so much to all. I believe I am beginning to understand.

I have ordered the Giandel 2200W 12V inverter. It has a permanent 3-wire connection for higher power-required service that includes a ground connection. It also has a case ground connection and I previously added a chassis ground connection for my old, failed inverter to which I can connect the case ground on the new Giandel. That eliminates any question about how I should connect the new Giandel.

Note: At the same time I added the extra ground connection for the old inverter, I also disconnected the 3 other chassis ground connections (power panel, generator, and ?), cleaned the corrosion and rust, purchased new brass bolts and re-installed those ground connections using liberal amounts of dielectric grease. I think I am good there.

The only remaining problem is installing the on/off switch for connecting the inverter to the RV's AC power panel. I have a marine-grade 1-Off-2 selector switch to use for (1) inverter input to the power panel, or (2) generator input to the power panel. That switch will connect to the power panel through the existing transfer switch (for the Onan generator). That way, shore power and/or inverter/generator power cannot be on at the same time. I will mount that switch next to the generator prime/start/stop/hours control panel so it is difficult to make a mistake on the power input source. The only time that switch will be on the generator connection is when I am starting the genset. Since I have to turn the genset off at the same location, it will be harder for me to leave the 1-Off-2 switch on the generator setting when turning on the inverter. And, even if I did, the inverter power would not go to the power panel.

If I have problems installing the new inverter and the switch, I will ask questions here, of course.

Lastly, I appreciate that for some it may be preferred, safer, more comfortable to install separate GFCI plugs wired directly to the inverter. In my RV layout, that would mean literally removing the permanently mounted TV and built-in microwave every time I wanted to switch from inverter power when boondocking to shore power at an RV park, or vice-versa. That's not viable for me. At my age I can barely lift the microwave into the high built-in location, as it is.

Again my heartfelt thank you to everyone who has contributed to my education and problem-solving.

jesfl
 
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Zil

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Installing a pit water meter my boss got knocked on his ass when he cut the copper feed pipe with out putting a jumper across the pipe.
 

Zil

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Back to Jesfl. You should have a GFCI outlet anyplace you can be part of the short circuit. S&B that is usually any outlet near water pipes. I recommend GFCI any outlet used often, as toaster or coffee pot or etc. In the RV any place you will be in contact with the metal parts as chassis is the ground plane. They should protect you from shore as well as inverter power. I use inverter only outlets as I don't need a transfer switch not using shore power except occasionally for battery charging. Some day you may want to replace the transfer switch with one with three circuits in with one circuit out.
 

12VoltInstalls

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You can GFCI a broad range of loads- just buy GFCI breakers. (Am I wrong that they make combo arc-fault GFCI breakers, too)

GFCI breaker is enough imho

No removing appliances
 

Zil

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GFCI outlets are much less money than GFCI breakers. GFCI outlets do not have to be on every outlet. I don't use them on radios or TV. But the use or not use of GFCI is complicated and you should do your own research. It's not my life you could end, it is yours.
 
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