diy solar

diy solar

Is this real or a hoax? California $0.00 export rate

They are basically saying they don't want any more power from anyone but still charging 0.45/kWh for it? Crazy.

People need to figure out how to sell to their neighbors at a discounted price if they are simply giving it away for free.
We have been trying to figure out a way to do that where We live.

Unfortunately too much distance for an extension cord.
 
1. I was confused by that post. I hadn't heard that the NEM3 ACC can go to 0, but maybe it can.

2. Wholesale prices were literally negative that day. So in a more realistic world, they should have been charged for their exports.
 
Totally expected. California currently has more solar than any other state; there are days when solar plus wind supplies 100% of the power in the state. When that happens they literally can't handle any more solar generation. That's why it goes to zero. They don't want it.

We are still on true net metering, DR rate, under NEM 2.0. That means we do get 100% credit for all the solar we generate. We have been fighting tooth and nail to hang on to that and so far we have been successful. But I'm also getting ready to replace our ancient Fronius inverters with an AIO (hopefully the Midnite) because I know that's not going to last forever, and eventually we will get moved to a time-of-use plan with reduced payback.
 
Many thousands of brand new homes have sprung up on what used to be pastures around Sacramento Ca. I was driving in an area that I haven’t been in for a few years and was shocked to see so many houses topped with the mandated black splotches. All making power predominately when it isn’t needed and not storing it. Now if the power companies would invest in storage, that would be a different story. In the future, I wouldn’t put it past them if they find out that you have a battery that they’d try take some power from the house or car without asking or proper compensation during peak.
 
Much lower feed in credit than import tariff has been the norm in Australia for a decade. Rooftop PV is generating energy when the grid least needs it, often with little or no capacity for the grid management to curtail it, so its value should reflect that.

Here the main issue is network costs (transmission, distribution, metering, market oversight etc) are only levied on energy purchased from the grid, and not on exported energy, hence the price disparity.

Increasingly, grid level management of rooftop PV is becoming a requirement for new systems, so that on days when VRE output is high and demand low (e.g. a mild sunny Spring day) then the market operator can reduce rooftop PV output to aid maintain grid stability. If it is valued at nothing then not exporting excess does not cost anything.

Rooftop PV should always, first and foremost, be about self-consumption. Direct consumption at time of production though load management, e.g. water heating/storage, EVs, thermal loading of the home (pre-cool/heat), home batteries. This is especially the case where import tariffs are high.
 
Now if the power companies would invest in storage, that would be a different story.
They are adding 1.5 gigawatts of storage capacity a year.
In the future, I wouldn’t put it past them if they find out that you have a battery that they’d try take some power from the house or car without asking or proper compensation during peak.
They do something like that with me. An aggregator - OhmConnect - pays me $$$ to feed power back to the grid during power shortages. I've made about $1800 in the past four years.
 
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