LiFePO4 heating pad for cold temperatures

HRTKD

Boondocker
Simple and effective may not be the same thing in this situation. The Battle Born solution is very similar to what I came up with. It keeps the batteries warm enough that they can be charged at any time. If you go with the built-in warming solutions that warm the battery once a charge is detected then you're likely wasting as much as two hours of (daytime sun) charging time to the battery while the batteries come up to temperature.
 

Horsefly

Solar Enthusiast
I like simple and I like reliable. That's why I went with a solution that requires zero energy while monitoring and energizing the temperature control. I have found that the silicone heating pads kick out an amazing amount of heat, rather quickly.
I'm a little confused. The item you linked to is a refrigeration control unit, meaning it turns ON when the temperature gets above a certain set point, and turns off once it gets cooler than some amount below the set point. How are you using this to control your heating pads?
 

noenegdod

Solar Enthusiast
I like simple and I like reliable. That's why I went with a solution that requires zero energy while monitoring and energizing the temperature control. I have found that the silicone heating pads kick out an amazing amount of heat, rather quickly.
Yup. Those are similar to the ones I went with too. You can wire them in series to reduce the density. I am using 4 under 16 280ah cells. 2 in series for maintenance temp control and the other 2 for when I have had the vehicle in storage and let everything get cold and need to actually recover from -20C.
 

TGPB

Solar Enthusiast
I'm a little confused. The item you linked to is a refrigeration control unit, meaning it turns ON when the temperature gets above a certain set point, and turns off once it gets cooler than some amount below the set point. How are you using this to control your heating pads?
It has a NO and NC set of contacts.
 

Horsefly

Solar Enthusiast
It has a NO and NC set of contacts.
Ok, that explains it. Thanks for that.

I think we've discussed this before: When you emphasize that this takes "zero energy" you obviously are not talking about the heating elements. Those can consume a fair amount (single digit to low teen) of amps. So I assume you are talking about the thermostat itself. Are you comparing it to the little digital thermostat that @HRTKD has used? His thermostat uses a few milliamps, which is very close to zero. Seems comparing zero to something really close to zero doesn't seem to mean much.
 

TGPB

Solar Enthusiast
Ok, that explains it. Thanks for that.

I think we've discussed this before: When you emphasize that this takes "zero energy" you obviously are not talking about the heating elements. Those can consume a fair amount (single digit to low teen) of amps. So I assume you are talking about the thermostat itself. Are you comparing it to the little digital thermostat that @HRTKD has used? His thermostat uses a few milliamps, which is very close to zero. Seems comparing zero to something really close to zero doesn't seem to mean much.
There are lots of little Chinese components that can fail in that electronic device vs a thermo-mechanical device that has decades of dependability under its hood. I like, not depending on relays, 10k sensors and circuit boards put together by 10 year old children.

I know I can't avoid Chinese Electronics completely, but when given an equal or better choice, I will pursue the high road. In this case I feel it is a better choice.
 
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