Looking to buy dead inverters

KSisk

New Member
Since it’s not going to be used very much ( emergency generator) or for extended amount of time. I am just trying to find a decent 24v inverter (new, used maybe someone upgrade and has one) since I am on disability. lam not picky. Do you know where I can look
 

Supervstech

Administrator
Staff member
Moderator
Since it’s not going to be used very much ( emergency generator) or for extended amount of time. I am just trying to find a decent 24v inverter (new, used maybe someone upgrade and has one) since I am on disability. lam not picky. Do you know where I can look
Craigslist, and eBay have gotten me cheap stuff to play with.
 

Tecnodave

Solar Addict
Still for sale Two original Dynamote Brutus Inverters, Older than the legendary original Trace....The first high/low frequency inverter. The first “viable off grid inverter”, still meeting factory specs. They dont build them like this any more.
 

dixonge

Solar Enthusiast
That is so very true! However, how much are you will to spend to do so? A typical 20" LCD tv can be had at Walmart for less than $200. Are you willing to spend $400 to replace the LCD screen after the dog knocked it over? Nope, I'm sure as hell won't be.
This is true even at much lower repair cost levels, for other reasons. I recently made an upgrade decision on a TV (in my RV). It was *not* an economical one. I could have replaced the plug for about $20 and it *might* have continued to work. The power supply connection was a bit loose on the circuit board, but still probably would work.

However, I gained the following by upgrading for around $180 (32" Roku TV from Philips):
  1. Lowered the weight by half.
  2. Lowered the weight by an additional 25 pounds due to the insanely massive metal hinged cabinet door frame it was attached to.
  3. Lowered the power consumption, important as we mostly boondock on solar. This is true even though the new TV is AC vs. the older DC model.
  4. Lowered the power consumption an additional amount since the new TV is 'smart' and can connect directly to WiFi, so I no longer need to run a separate computer for get online content.
In comparison, our first 'high definition' TV was a 36" glass tube model that weighed 215 pounds and cost us $1000. It lasted around 20 years.
 

Supervstech

Administrator
Staff member
Moderator
This is true even at much lower repair cost levels, for other reasons. I recently made an upgrade decision on a TV (in my RV). It was *not* an economical one. I could have replaced the plug for about $20 and it *might* have continued to work. The power supply connection was a bit loose on the circuit board, but still probably would work.

However, I gained the following by upgrading for around $180 (32" Roku TV from Philips):
  1. Lowered the weight by half.
  2. Lowered the weight by an additional 25 pounds due to the insanely massive metal hinged cabinet door frame it was attached to.
  3. Lowered the power consumption, important as we mostly boondock on solar. This is true even though the new TV is AC vs. the older DC model.
  4. Lowered the power consumption an additional amount since the new TV is 'smart' and can connect directly to WiFi, so I no longer need to run a separate computer for get online content.
In comparison, our first 'high definition' TV was a 36" glass tube model that weighed 215 pounds and cost us $1000. It lasted around 20 years.
Ha! I still have my first high def tube tv… it works as an alarm clock for me. An old Samsung 32” it DOES weigh around 200#…
 
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