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low voltage disconnect

soooooo have many inverters they all disconnect around 10.5.too low,so how do i fix that
 
soooooo have many inverters they all disconnect around 10.5.too low,so how do i fix that
Most of the mobile inverters lack any ability to adjust low voltage shutdown. Workarounds with a external low voltage relay tend to be hard to implement and often do not do what you want. Your best option is to buy those inverters that allow you to adjust various voltage events. These tend to be either inverter/chargers (with ATS) or AIO's.
 
is their something like moes ats where i can adjust the voltage,i have the moes but to dangerous,fries inverters
 
can you point me in the right direction,for a relay,seen a video where they wired a lvd to the rocker switch on the inverter
 
can you point me in the right direction,for a relay,seen a video where they wired a lvd to the rocker switch on the inverter
Sorry but my efforts to implement it a couple of years ago were disappointing so I instead went to an AIO. Much easier to work with.
 
can you point me in the right direction,for a relay,seen a video where they wired a lvd to the rocker switch on the inverter
What inverter do you have? Does it have a remote switch/panel ?
If so, it's not that hard. I recently did this with a voltage sensing relay and an FCHAO 24v 1800w inverter.
I opened up the remote panel, which has a simple ON/OFF switch. Soldered two wires, one to each if the switch terminals. Then connected these wire to the relay.
Of course you need to supply power to the relay too.
I like this solution because it's a soft shutdown. Another option would be to use a contactor on the DC inputs of the inverter
But I don't like the idea of "pulling the plug" while inverter is under load.
Here are some pics:
20240413_222614.jpg
20240413_222624.jpg20240413_223154.jpg
20240420_225620.jpg

The relay used is one that has a 24v working voltage. 12v ones exist too. If you have a 48v system, you will need a DC-DC step down converter to power the relay.

Here is a link to the relay:


What's nice about it is that you can configure it with a "disconnect" voltage (say 24v for a 24v system) but also a "return" voltage (say 25v). This helps minimize frequent ON/OFF when disconnecting, because of voltage sag and resting voltage of the battery.
 
i want to use is a 1100w pure sinewave 12v with a wireless remote control,could it be wired to the rocker switch on the inverter,hey timeselectric,how would you wire that up.looks interesting
 
i want to use is a 1100w pure sinewave 12v with a wireless remote control,could it be wired to the rocker switch on the inverter,hey timeselectric,how would you wire that up.looks interesting
Provide it power from the battery. And connect the power switch wires through the relay.
You can set individual voltage limits for both, on and off.
 
It will be trial and error setting a low voltage disconnect under load.

Depending on your charge controller, you may be able to set up the load terminals to signal a large relay/contactor to disconnect at a desired voltage.

In one example using a 150w dc-dc charger and an Epever 4210AN, I set the disconnect value to 11.5v under load to achieve a resting voltage of 12.4v

That said, I wouldn't use this method with a >12v inverter that requires pre-charging of the capacitors, but a 1100w 12v inverter would be fine.
 
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guys thanks for the help,i do have a 2000w with the remote pad also 24v,,need more pics lol,little scared both inverters are new
 
Here is a video of Andy using one to control a balancer.
It will give you an idea of how it works. And how you set the limits.

 
What inverter do you have? Does it have a remote switch/panel ?
If so, it's not that hard. I recently did this with a voltage sensing relay and an FCHAO 24v 1800w inverter.
I opened up the remote panel, which has a simple ON/OFF switch. Soldered two wires, one to each if the switch terminals. Then connected these wire to the relay.
Of course you need to supply power to the relay too.
I like this solution because it's a soft shutdown. Another option would be to use a contactor on the DC inputs of the inverter
But I don't like the idea of "pulling the plug" while inverter is under load.
Here are some pics:
View attachment 214742
View attachment 214743View attachment 214744
View attachment 214741

The relay used is one that has a 24v working voltage. 12v ones exist too. If you have a 48v system, you will need a DC-DC step down converter to power the relay.

Here is a link to the relay:


What's nice about it is that you can configure it with a "disconnect" voltage (say 24v for a 24v system) but also a "return" voltage (say 25v). This helps minimize frequent ON/OFF when disconnecting, because of voltage sag and resting voltage of the battery.
sorry,could you clairify where those wirers are going i see the pic but a little confused,i see 7 wires
 
sorry,could you clairify where those wirers are going i see the pic but a little confused,i see 7 wires
Yeah, I had some more things going on in that picture.
Let's focus on this:
20240420_225620.jpg
Basically, you need 6 lines:
1. Voltage sensing lines (pos/neg) going to your battery pos/neg, or straight to the inverter DC inputs.
2. 2 lines to the rocker switch terminals. These are the lines that are switched (connected/disconnected) by the relay. You want one going to the COM port of the relay. and the other to the NO port (doesn't matter which line of the switch goes where, as long as you you use the COM and NO ports).
3. Power to the relay (pos/neg). Make sure you get the appropriate relay voltage for your needs (12v or 24v).

Hope it's clear now.
 
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