New Daly "Smart" BMS w/ Communication. (80-250A)

alex68

New Member
Hi, did anyone managed to connect to the Daly BMS over RS-485 (PX connector) and read the data, not from a PC but form, f.e, an Arduino or similar? THX!!
I have built my own AC coupled battery with an ESP32 as a controller and I would need to read out the SOC to know if charging is required or not.

1617634955821.png
 

alex68

New Member
Thank you for your replies.
I suppose that they use the USB-RS485 cable provided by Daly and my approach/intention was to connect directly to the BMS by using the 3 Pins (TX, RX and GND on the Px connector) - but for some reason the Daly-BMS refuses to talk to me.
My hope is that somebody out there has managed to overcome this issue and is willing to share his knowledge...
 

Jonathan98011

New Member
New to DIY batteries and to Daly. Ordered my first BMS about 2 weeks ago and it arrived with the USB cable but the dongle portion was no where in sight. I have since ordered a BT from the Daly store but that will not arrive for some time so question I have is are there any USB modules on Amazon that will work with the 250A smart BMS? I have attempted 2 different ones and can get them to power via the BMS (Thanks to the pinout diagrams on this thread) but have not been able to get the Daly App to see the device. I have not been able to locate the BT chipset being used by Daly so it is kind of a craps-shoot at this point.
 

danb35

Solar Enthusiast
I suppose that they use the USB-RS485 cable provided by Daly and my approach/intention was to connect directly to the BMS by using the 3 Pins (TX, RX and GND on the Px connector)
What you're dealing with there would be the raw RS485 signals--to get them to talk with an Arduino would still take an adapter (something like https://www.amazon.com/SMAKN®-Adapter-Serial-Converter-Module/dp/B010723BCE, I think). Then, it's just a matter of implementing the protocol correctly. Are you familiar with the protocol? If not, you can find the docs here:
 

PF075

New Member
It's unfortunate that he doesn't post the source code (for this or for solpiplog, though the latter is explicitly claimed to be open-source), only compiled binaries that will only run on a Raspberry Pi. But it does seem to be the only product currently running that will monitor the Daly BMS.
Is this the source code you were looking for?

 

danb35

Solar Enthusiast
Is this the source code you were looking for?
No, it's a lie. The link that says "source code" is just an archive of the contents of the GitHub repo at that time--which contain only a few screen shots and text files (if you don't believe me, download it for yourself and see). The link that says dalylog_0.9.1.zip contains a compiled executable, not the source code.

And this isn't just a matter of my being an open-source zealot--I want to monitor my BMS, but I don't want to use a Raspberry Pi to do it. The BMS is within 3' or less of my VM host, on which I'm running a Linux VM that's already monitoring my MPP inverter. Its storage is much more reliable than the SD cards the Pi uses, it's already wired to my network, etc. There's no reason to use another device here--except that this software will only run on a Pi.

Of course, this is his code; he's entitled to release it under whatever conditions he chooses. But it's unfortunate that he's doing it this way.
 

danb35

Solar Enthusiast
Have you identified the platform dependency?
It's a compiled binary for ARM architecture--that's the only code made available for download. No source, no x86 binary. I'd assume it could be compiled readily enough for x86, if you had the source code, but AFAIK the only one who has the source code is the author.
 

smoothJoey

Get offa my dock
It's a compiled binary for ARM architecture--that's the only code made available for download. No source, no x86 binary. I'd assume it could be compiled readily enough for x86, if you had the source code, but AFAIK the only one who has the source code is the author.

Ok, I would call that a policy decision by the author.
My policy is the not touch any github project that has opaque bits.
There may be exceptions but they would be few and far between.
 

danb35

Solar Enthusiast
but the answer seems to be here:
Well, perhaps not. The batteries are finally here (boy, was I optimistic when I said back in December I expected them in "a month or so"), they're wired up, the BMS is connected, and as far as the solar system is concerned, it's all working.

But there's no communication. I'm guessing it's because I've wired something incorrectly, but I can't see what. Here's where it's connected to the BMS:
1618409239137.png
Per the manual, the right-most two wires are A and B, respectively. They're connected to the center two terminals of the USB adapter like this:
1618409410434.png
(and on the off chance I got the wiring wrong, I tried swapping the two--no change).

Plugged the USB adapter into my computer and installed the appropriate drivers, so it now appears to Windows as COM3:. But the software just won't connect.

I'm using the software posted at https://diysolarforum.com/resources/daly-smart-bms-pc-software.50/. I start the software, click CommSet in the upper-right, and it defaults to COM3/9600 baud. I then click the Open Port button, and nothing happens. Like, at all. It doesn't give an error message, the Serial port set window stays there, nothing on the big window shows any values. A little puzzled here--any idea what I'm doing wrong?
 

ultrakiev

Solar Enthusiast
SOC. After fully charged to 14.4 LiFePo4 pack blue tooth app showed 100% state of charge. But after an hour or so voltage normally equallized to 13.7V and app showing 83% which is not accurate. So I changed system voltage settings in Sinowealth BMS software to values stated in LFP VOLTAGE Chart PDF here on the forum. And now I have a relatively accurate reading based on voltage.
But charge end voltage is still adjusted separately, see 3rd photo it's set to 3650.(My actual charger set to cut out at 14.2)
What's your opinion guys on this SOC adjustment?
 

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MisterSandals

Participation Medalist
so voltage normally equallized to 13.7V
13.7v / 4 = 3.425

Is there a reason you used 3.450 (3450mv) instead of the calculated value?

This is all very close and your numbers look very realistic. I have not seen that ability
to map SoC before and it looks very handy.

Bottom line is whether the SoC represents YOUR battery, so if you say its accurate, thats everything.
 

ultrakiev

Solar Enthusiast
13.7v / 4 = 3.425

Is there a reason you used 3.450 (3450mv) instead of the calculated value?

This is all very close and your numbers look very realistic. I have not seen that ability
to map SoC before and it looks very handy.

Bottom line is whether the SoC represents YOUR battery, so if you say its accurate, thats everything.
3.450V I just used the chart in pdf.
 

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ultrakiev

Solar Enthusiast
I just noticed a mistake. Bank was set to 10000mAh and I have 100000mAh when I changed this parameter to 100000mAh SOC dropped down to 10%.
So unfortunately my adjustments didn't work.

update: after performing a system reset via app, everything works now as I stated in my first post with the correct 100000mAh now.
 

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PF075

New Member
No, it's a lie. The link that says "source code" is just an archive of the contents of the GitHub repo at that time--which contain only a few screen shots and text files (if you don't believe me, download it for yourself and see). The link that says dalylog_0.9.1.zip contains a compiled executable, not the source code.

And this isn't just a matter of my being an open-source zealot--I want to monitor my BMS, but I don't want to use a Raspberry Pi to do it. The BMS is within 3' or less of my VM host, on which I'm running a Linux VM that's already monitoring my MPP inverter. Its storage is much more reliable than the SD cards the Pi uses, it's already wired to my network, etc. There's no reason to use another device here--except that this software will only run on a Pi.

Of course, this is his code; he's entitled to release it under whatever conditions he chooses. But it's unfortunate that he's doing it this way.

Have you tried running it via qemu? I dont have a Daly BMS at present to hack, so its not something I can do. But it might be worth a shot.
 

danb35

Solar Enthusiast
Have you tried running it via qemu?
I actually hadn't thought about that, and it'd be interesting to try. But it looks like the author of the software I'm using to monitor my MPP inverter is willing to add BMS support as well, so that's likely the direction I'd be going--assuming I can get the connection working at all:
 
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Dforster

New Member
You should try the HEYO range of BMS units (identical to the DALY units). Really good, excellent email help if you have issues/questions, fitted 30+ of them now with no faults, the ones I use have NTC, LightBoard, UART and RS485 outputs (and you can use them all at one time, so you can still use the BT module with your phone app to setup levels, etc., and the RS485 output (with this software on a Raspberry Pi - https://github.com/njfaria/dalylog) to then provide monitoring over network (DalyLog outputs to MQTT, this can then be read using Node Red to make a fancy dash you can see via HTML browser) - using a VPN you can then see your battery stats anywhere in the world on any browser/phone/pad, etc.
 
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