Solar Equipment Requirement

lou124

New Member
Hi all,

So I'm new to solar panels and the equipment that goes with them. I would like some advice please. I have been given a quote on a solar setup and the products they provide with this. Here is what they have suggested:

solar panel 250w x 4
Inverter 1500va Hybrid Schnerider
Luminous Tubular Battery 200ah x 2
combiner box

With those solar panels that would give me 1000w x 5 hours a day = 5000w/5 kWH which i believe would be enough to run a 80-100w fridge right?

The inverter with a given price of ~ £190 , seems a lot, more than what i wanted to spend. Having looked on a website its recommended for that amount of solar wattage but for a 24v system but i'm still debating whether to go 24 volts. I could go the same make inverter but 850w which supports a 12v system but it is only recommended for 850w solar panels. So my question is, is this a good choice, do i really need to spend this much on an inverter?

Also i just looked at the specifics, the recommended battery types for these inverters are tubular, flat plate, gel/VRLA
https://solarshopnigeria.com/schneider-homaya-solar-hybrid-system.html

The other issue is the batteries he has suggested. About £210 each. They are heavy, flooded and very large. i think produced in India. I presume because these batteries are suited to the inverter.
https://www.luminousindia.com/iltt-25060.html
Whats everyones advice on these, a good choice? I would prefer to go with lithium ion if i can get hold of them here.

NOTE: i live in Indonesia. Its hot & humid with sometime severe thunderstorms
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
Check a consumer energy label. Full-size fridges I see in the US are expected to use about 1500 Wh/day.
1500 VA is a small inverter, but should be enough to run a refrigerator. I figure 5x the wattage rating of the motor for starting surge.
How much power does the inverter consume under no-load? Does it have an idle mode where it goes to sleep, produces AC periodically to see if loads present?

If you can arrange by timer or light sensor to turn off the refrigerator at night, battery won't have to be so big. H2O is a cheaper way to store energy than Pb or Li. A suitably tuned blend of H2O and NaCl should keep freezer section nice and cold.

For a low-maintenance system I prefer AGM to FLA. They do cost more. These days, people order LiFePO4 cells direct from China, add a BMS, and have a battery for about 40% the cost of AGM. Maybe $600 for 12V 280 Ah.
 

lou124

New Member
So lets say i get an energy efficient fridge which i run during the day and have it turned off a night. Would the fridge use energy directly from the sun during the day,would it by pass the batteries?
1500 VA is a small inverter, but should be enough to run a refrigerator. I figure 5x the wattage rating of the motor for starting surge.
How much power does the inverter consume under no-load? Does it have an idle mode where it goes to sleep, produces AC periodically to see if loads present?
Would i be better to go with a 2000w inverter then?
the questions that you've written above should be something i look for when buying an inverter? should they be specified?
For a low-maintenance system I prefer AGM to FLA. They do cost more. These days, people order LiFePO4 cells direct from China, add a BMS, and have a battery for about 40% the cost of AGM. Maybe $600 for 12V 280 Ah.
I have looked at AGM batteries and this would be my 2nd choice. Are they safe for a newbie? i would prefer something with less maintenance and reliable. What is a BMS?
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
The fridge will turn on and off when its thermostat switches. If it has a defroster, that will turn on with a timer. It will draw the power it wants.
PV panel will deliver the power it can produce from the sun, unless battery is full and doesn't want the current.
Battery will deliver any additional power needed by fridge in excess of what PV makes. It will accept charging available from PV, or whatever current it takes during absorption stage, whichever is less.
So the battery will cycle up and down to meet demand. Better than at night when it would just discharge.

An inverter will have a continuous current rating (e.g. 2000W), and may specify a surge rating (e.g. 4000W for 3 seconds.). If the surge is for a fraction of a second it probably doesn't help. If you want to power a heating appliance like microwave or kettle, you'll need a bigger one (maybe a bigger battery too.) 2000W is about the maximum reasonable size inverter for a 12V battery or a 100 Ah battery, unless that's just to start a load that draws less when operating. The 400 Ah battery you're thinking of would be better than 100 Ah, but maybe not needed if you avoid running at night.

Yes, see what no-load current the inverter specs show. Could be 10W (240 Wh/day) or could be 100W (2400 Wh/day).
It may also offer a low-power mode where it uses much less if AC appliances turned off. See if it has that, convenient way to handle turning it on by switching lights, refrigerator, etc.

AGM is simple and moderately expensive. A good charge controller and enough PV panels should keep it well charged. Iifespan could range from 1 year to 10 years depending on depth of discharge and quality. They are pretty safe as long as you don't short them out like with a wrench; that could melt. About like working with a car battery.

You can buy ready-made LiFePO4 batteries, but I think they cost about $900 for 12V 100Ah. Some may be less these days.

Lithium batteries including LiFePO4 need to be controlled so they never discharge too low (below about 2.5V) or recharge too high (above about 3.5V). They are almost guaranteed to be ruined if taken well beyond those voltages. Other lithium chemistries have a reputation for catching fire if that happens. Also, they can't be charged below freezing. maximum charge rate if close to freezing is about 1/10th what it can take at room temperature.

A BMS (battery management system) has wires to monitor voltage of each cell. If any one goes outside that range, it opens a relay or turns off FETs to shut down charging and discharging. If temperature gets down to 32 degrees F or above a maximum, it shuts down charging.

People here buy cells either from one of a couple trusted vendors direct from China, or from a forum member who sells them. They buy a BMS from Daly, REC, or another (choose based on maximum current draw and other characteristics.) They purchase an adjustable power supply to balance the cells. They clean oxide off the terminals, maybe apply corrosion inhibitor, bolt on busbars (carefully, some are weak), attach BMS.

DIY LiFePO4 might cost $600 for 12V 280 Ah.
I think that is about 40% the cost of high-quality AGM and might last 5 times longer, like 10 years cycles to 80% DoD vs. 2 years.
But a 100 Ah AGM costing $350 might last 10 years if only cycled 15% because fridge powered while PV produces.

My big system has excess PV, so battery stays full and panels produce enough power in the (sunny) daytime to run all loads without drawing from the battery. PV panels are cheaper than batteries, so just put in extra.
 
Last edited:

lou124

New Member
Thanks for the complex reply...its definitely helping me understans more. I'm planning to meet solar panel specialist (Indonesian & Chinese Indonesian) in the coming weeks to discuss my set up and see what they can supply and cost. I may have to look outside Indonesia for batteries and some of the other compenents. I think solar panels are a reasonably new thing here.
 

Forbisher

Փփքխմպձժճֆըվմ
You can buy ready-made LiFePO4 batteries, but I think they cost about $900 for 12V 100Ah. Some may be less these days.

Lithium batteries including LiFePO4 need to be controlled so they never discharge too low (below about 2.5V) or recharge too high (above about 3.5V). They are almost guaranteed to be ruined if taken well beyond those voltages. Other lithium chemistries have a reputation for catching fire if that happens. Also, they can't be charged below freezing. maximum charge rate if close to freezing is about 1/10th what it can take at room temperature.

A BMS (battery management system) has wires to monitor voltage of each cell. If any one goes outside that range, it opens a relay or turns off FETs to shut down charging and discharging. If temperature gets down to 32 degrees F or above a maximum, it shuts down charging.

People here buy cells either from one of a couple trusted vendors direct from China, or from a forum member who sells them. They buy a BMS from Daly, REC, or another (choose based on maximum current draw and other characteristics.) They purchase an adjustable power supply to balance the cells. They clean oxide off the terminals, maybe apply corrosion inhibitor, bolt on busbars (carefully, some are weak), attach BMS.

DIY LiFePO4 might cost $600 for 12V 280 Ah.
I think that is about 40% the cost of high-quality AGM and might last 5 times longer, like 10 years cycles to 80% DoD vs. 2 years.
But a 100 Ah AGM costing $350 might last 10 years if only cycled 15% because fridge powered while PV produces.

My big system has excess PV, so battery stays full and panels produce enough power in the (sunny) daytime to run all loads without drawing from the battery. PV panels are cheaper than batteries, so just put in extra.
Ready made good LFP 12V 100Ah batteries are down to $500 to $570 now with 200Ah even cheaper.
$950 is Battle Born 12V 100Ah pricing.

Once you go LFP you ain't going back to lead batteries.
There are so many advantages over lead.
 

lou124

New Member
Ready made good LFP 12V 100Ah batteries are down to $500 to $570 now with 200Ah even cheaper.
$950 is Battle Born 12V 100Ah pricing.

Once you go LFP you ain't going back to lead batteries.
There are so many advantages over lead.
If i am buying online, how do i know if they are ready made? Also I would be getting a local specialist (Indonesian/Chinese) to do the install, will they know about this? I am really new to all of this and looking online in Indonesia is not easy. I'm not getting the answer i need. Can anyone suggest where I can shop online? I would then have to look into the laws of getting it sent to Indonesia and the taxes i would have to pay 😕😖

I would love a Battle Born , as i've watched and heard amazing things about them but its slightly out of my price range
 

Tecnodave

Solar Addict
If i am buying online, how do i know if they are ready made? Also I would be getting a local specialist (Indonesian/Chinese) to do the install, will they know about this? I am really new to all of this and looking online in Indonesia is not easy. I'm not getting the answer i need. Can anyone suggest where I can shop online? I would then have to look into the laws of getting it sent to Indonesia and the taxes i would have to pay 😕😖

I would love a Battle Born , as i've watched and heard amazing things about them but its slightly out of my price range
shipping a USA assembled battery is way too expensive to consider as the components of ready made batteries are mostly made in China. The assembled batteries have several cells connected in series and controlled by a BMS...battery management system. For newcomers i always recommend flooded lead acid, but then i do not know what is available there. You want to find out what you can get there.

One thing that you might want to look into is a DC refrigerator, they are expensive in the USA but in third world countries that have more primitive electric grids they are much more common. Sharp has many 12/24 volt models available throughout Asia and the islands where electricity is sometimes remote, unfortunately these are not available here in the US. I have several Asian manufactured 5 cu.ft. fridges that will work on one 100 watt solar panel and one 100a.h. battery here in California, maybe 1/4 the power of an AC fridge. The better ones have a compressor by Danforth of Holland, Colku of China has a good clone of the Danforth. Mine are Colku, 8 years now, nary a hitch....broken hinge on freezer door....still works 42 watts at 12 volts or 24 volts, less than 20% run time, its hot here, also has a built in 120 volt converter.
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
A local specialist wouldn't necessarily know how to set up system with lithium batteries properly. If he doesn't, it might run for a while but rapidly degrade. If he does, then he would set charge voltages properly. He also can do only as well as the system design, meaning selection of components and balancing to each other.

Someone needs to design the system, select components, and define settings first. This would include BMS able to handle surge and continuous current of inverter, charge current appropriate for battery size, vendor specs, ambient temperature. Settings for charge controller, inverter low-battery cutout, and BMS should be defined.

In the U.S., much "professional" work on homes is contracted by a firm that hires technicians/laborers to do the work. They just follow steps they've been taught. For instance, putting grid-tie PV on the roof of thousands of homes. More customized work like a battery system for off-grid would be better done under the direct supervision of someone who designed it for your application, and is familiar with the brand/model of equipment.

Depending on price and availability, you might want to select equipment that supports both lead-acid and LiFePO4. Start out with lead if cheap locally, and switch to lithium when it wears out in a couple years, assuming affordable assembled lithium batteries become available. Otherwise, learn how do DIY with individual cells and BMS, which forum members are doing in many countries. DIY lithium is already lower purchase price than lead-acid and longer lasting.
 

lou124

New Member
thanks for your replies. I went to see a specialist in the local city here. Talking to him made things a little clearer. He uses flooded batteries because LifePO4 batteries are not readily available here and generally sold non marked (presumely not made in a factory/DIY type). Therefore doesn't know the quality. The battery he uses are these, which after research seem to be good and not too much maintenance, he says once a month.


Is it true that these type of deep cycle batteries, the DOD is 50% or can they be discharged to say 20%?

In the U.S., much "professional" work on homes is contracted by a firm that hires technicians/laborers to do the work. They just follow steps they've been taught. For instance, putting grid-tie PV on the roof of thousands of homes. More customized work like a battery system for off-grid would be better done under the direct supervision of someone who designed it for your application, and is familiar with the brand/model of equipment.
I'm not confident enough to do the set up myself so for me this is the only way to go i think. Yes this seems to be the case with this guy we've seen in the city. He has customized a setup for our house, after i sent him wattage comsumption, he sent theses details and quote. But, his customised set up seems outrageous for our needs.
solar power setup & quote.JPG
12 panels at 250w would give me 3,000w but with 5 hours of sun = 15,000w/ 15kWh. I generally worked out our energy consumption for the day with a fridge (1.5kWh p/d) with a an autonomy of 1 day for lights and charging laptops/mobiles would be 3.7 kWh per day but lets say 4kWh. This was also calculated with efficiency loss as well. We would use the rice cooker and blenders during the day so really the battery charge would be needed for the evening lights and running the fridge.

To be me, what he is suggesting is stupidly big?
Surely, 4 x 250 w panels with 2 x 200ah batteries on a 24v system would be enough? like what was given in my first post?

Depending on price and availability, you might want to select equipment that supports both lead-acid and LiFePO4. Start out with lead if cheap locally, and switch to lithium when it wears out in a couple years, assuming affordable assembled lithium batteries become available.
I think this is the only option i have got at the moment. I am not confident in putting together lifePO4 batteries, as i just wouldn't know where to begin!
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
98,000,000.00 IDR = 6,881.07 USD? entire system, 3kW PV, 3kW inverter, 10kW battery (5kW usable)
Not expensive to US consumers, but expensive where wages are lower.
Does that include installation?? "upah pasang + commissioning" (installation wages)

2,250,000.00 IDR = 157.98 USD one 250W PV panel. $0.63/watt
We may pay $0.20 to $0.50/watt for PV panels. Sometimes more. Some less (often used) but I think people ordering quantities direct from China get them cheap.
I like oversize PV array, able to produce enough power under varying weather, and minimizing discharge of battery.
In winter or cloudy seasons, maybe 2 hours equivalent sunlight? Check an insolation calculator. Try to find one that includes weather effects.

4,250,000.00 IDR = 298.41 USD each for Four, 200 Ah 12V batteries. Probably connected in series for 48V. Wet cell?
Half the price per Wh of my AGM, which are maintenance free. I cycle mine to 30% SoC, but only for occasional power failures.
If you cycle yours every night, shallower discharge needed for long life. If you mostly run loads only off PV, not drawing down the batteries, then they could last quite a few years.
The DIY batteries people here build cost same or less, and would be expected to last 10 years of nightly deep cycling. You have to be comfortable with hazardous electrical work to tackle that.

17,000,000.00 IDR = 1,193.66 USD 3kW inverter
I don't see reference to lithium. Would be good to get an inverter that lets parameters be set for various lithium batteries including LiFePO4.

I'm not familiar with any of these brands.
It is good to get something that has been installed in your area and is known to be reliable.
Can you visit customers from prior years?

The battery page says 15A charge rate. Even with a 48V battery being charged at 60V, that's only 900W.
Your PV array will be 3000W nominal, probably 2500W typical peak.
I wonder if the installer programs charge rate to 15A. If so, recharging from 50% DoD will take 7 hours or so, plus a couple hours during the slower constant-voltage absorption.
While its charging, you'll also have about 1500W available for loads.
 

lou124

New Member
98,000,000.00 IDR = 6,881.07 USD? entire system, 3kW PV, 3kW inverter, 10kW battery (5kW usable)
Not expensive to US consumers, but expensive where wages are lower.
Does that include installation?? "upah pasang + commissioning" (installation wages)
yes it does. i think what he is offering is a good system and yes i don't think it is so expensive. but it is out of my price range and i think the system is too large for what we need.

4,250,000.00 IDR = 298.41 USD each for Four, 200 Ah 12V batteries. Probably connected in series for 48V. Wet cell?
yes he said it would be set up for 48v...and yes wet cell as in flooded?
17,000,000.00 IDR = 1,193.66 USD 3kW inverter
I don't see reference to lithium. Would be good to get an inverter that lets parameters be set for various lithium batteries including LiFePO4.
this alone is my budget! haha. Before he knew our energy consumption he send a profile/set up for around 20,000,000 IDR, what was stated in my first post. i believe that this would be enough for our needs. The inverter for that set up was a Schneider Homaya 1500w hybrid. On their website it states that it only supports tubular, flat plate, gel/vrla batteries. With a price of £190 and possibly wanting to change to lithium ion in the future that's a lot of money (for me) to spending if i need to change it.


Here is the spec he sent for the solar NXT PCU. Yes there is no mention of what batteries it would work with. i will ask, thanks.


1623657946876.jpg
It is good to get something that has been installed in your area and is known to be reliable.
Can you visit customers from prior years?
He did to a house that he is currently installing but it wasn't up and running. There set up was for 25 panels. I do know of someone here who has bought the batteries of him but were using a generator to charge them.
The battery page says 15A charge rate. Even with a 48V battery being charged at 60V, that's only 900W.
Your PV array will be 3000W nominal, probably 2500W typical peak.
I wonder if the installer programs charge rate to 15A. If so, recharging from 50% DoD will take 7 hours or so, plus a couple hours during the slower constant-voltage absorption.
While its charging, you'll also have about 1500W available for loads.
I dont really understand this or what it means.
So if it programs to 15amps is that bad? what you've stated above seems slow, am i correct in thinking that? trying to get my head around all of this and understand it.

He also sent me the spec of the different batteries. Under the 150ah starting amp rate is 15.1 - finishing 7.6 amps. trickle mode charging minimum 126mAmp - max 504 mAmp. Again i have no idea what this means.
It states that the 200ah battery is c20 capacity.

Anyways what he has sent me i cant afford, i think it is too big for what i need. So i need to either need to look at different setup, or ask why he is suggesting this or i need to do more research and buy the equipment myself and find someone to install.
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
I dont really understand this or what it means.
So if it programs to 15amps is that bad? what you've stated above seems slow, am i correct in thinking that? trying to get my head around all of this and understand it.

The battery specification indicate a maximum allowed charge current. The amount of PV panels included in the proposed system could deliver too high a current, damaging them. The PV array is OK if the hybrid inverter is adjustable so it limits charge current to 15A. In that case, the large array is good because it can deliver enough power when the sun is at an angle, or when there is some cloud cover. (The extra power that is available can power appliances during the day which is good. Just don't want battery charged at 25A or whatever might be available.)

wet cell = flooded = FLA

(17,000,000.00 IDR = 1,193.66 USD) "this alone is my budget!"

Compared to his quote of 98,000,000.00 IDR = 6,881.07 USD for installed system.
You can get an idea from the items in his quote of how much PV array, mounting hardware, battery you could get for a lower price.

A smaller inverter of a different brand that used one 12V battery could make a small system. But it might not deliver enough AC power for your loads, or enough watt hours from PV panels and battery. Here in the US we could get an inverter, charge controller, battery, PV for $1000 or so, but it can't power much.

You have to review the loads you want to power, see how big a system is required.
With PV you are paying upfront for ten years of power (except lead-acid batteries usually have to be replace during that period.)
Sometimes people use a gas generator for larger loads, run small loads from PV.
 

lou124

New Member
17,000,000.00 IDR = 1,193.66 USD) "this alone is my budget!"
yes i have about 20,000,000 idr i would like to spend first. If this is not enough for a setup to run a fridge then i'd have to do without. THe idea would be to add Pv and batteries as tourism comes back and we grow into a retreat.

There is a chinese buddhist up the river from us who has a complete set up. He has 16 x 100w panels (i think 100w), 24v system but i dont know how many batteries. He's mounted his panels on a metal frame in the garden. He has a fridge or even 2 i think, rice cooker, blenders etc. When i spoke to him he said that 20,000,000 idr would get me enough PV and battaries to run a small household with fridge. He bought his panels and batteries online, then had someone to install it. I think i need to go to his place again and actually look at what hes got and how efficient it is.

Thanks for all the help, I'm sure i'll be asking more questions and i do more research
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
The key information is what electrical requirements of the fridge are. Watt-hours per day, running wattage, and starting surge.
Our large refrigerator/freezers in the US have a label indicating about 1500 Wh/day. Small fridges might use 500 to 700 Wh, some less.

Motor could be 100W to 300W. If it has a defrost cycle that burns more power. Assuming motor is 200W, starting surge should be no more than 1000W. A 1000W inverter will probably work.

You have to find out how much the inverter draws under no load. If 20W, there goes another 500 Wh/day. Unless it has a sleep mode to save power.

About 400W of panels should make 2000 Wh on a good day, might not be enough some days. I like extra panels.

One of those batteries, 200 Ah 12V, would be 2400 Wh total, 1200 Wh usable at 50% DoD. If you consume 1000 Wh/day, battery will only drain 25% at night. A different brand might tolerate higher charge rate.

And then you need a charge controller. You can have extra PV panels to make up for poor sun, but size the charge controller smaller so it doesn't deliver more current than the battery should get. Unfortunately, that means the extra isn't available to power loads at the same time.

Also wire, fuses, etc.

See if you can find an inverter and charge controller, or a hybrid, in your budget.
A hybrid may allow battery charge current to be regulated to desired amount, but pass more power from PV to inverter and AC loads. So look for that.

Heating appliances use a lot of watt-hours, would cost more to power.
 

lou124

New Member
The key information is what electrical requirements of the fridge are. Watt-hours per day, running wattage, and starting surge.
Our large refrigerator/freezers in the US have a label indicating about 1500 Wh/day. Small fridges might use 500 to 700 Wh, some less.
This is what i don't know as I havent got the fridge. I am using a small fridge (in our small old house ) atm as thats all i need (75w / 50l) but when we move into the new house i will need a standard size which is where the panels will be.

You have to find out how much the inverter draws under no load. If 20W, there goes another 500 Wh/day. Unless it has a sleep mode to save power.
ok thats interesting i wouldn't have thought of that, thanks

See if you can find an inverter and charge controller, or a hybrid, in your budget.
A hybrid may allow battery charge current to be regulated to desired amount, but pass more power from PV to inverter and AC loads. So look for that.
I'm just reading about hybrid inverters...would you suggest buying one of these over a normal one? I will look more into the one that guy is selling, Schneider homaya 1500w hybrid. The downside is that it doesnt work with lifePO4 batteries if i wanted to change to them in the future.
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
Good to support both chemistries, but for lowest price point you might end up with equipment that only supports lead-acid. In the future you would be upgrading to higher wattage, so it all gets replaced anyway.

I think a hybrid is the economical way to support lots of PV and a small battery.

Typical offgrid systems used to have separate charge controller and inverter. PV panels were expensive.
These days, batteries can be the most expensive item, and PV is cheap.

FLA batteries may do best with charge rate 0.12C, Gel 0.1C, AGM 0.2C (but it varies by brand). If you size panels and separate charge converter to avoid cooking the batteries, that limits power produced.
Lithium batteries typically accept up to 0.5C, but can't charge below zero degrees C, and max charge current drops as low as 0.07C near freezing. Within those maximums they tolerate any charge current and can be left partially discharged.

I think a hybrid, with PV and battery connections, can charge battery at a specific current you program, but convert additional PV whenever inverter needs it. I think that is they way to go because you can put in a larger PV array and avoid cycling the battery, so it lasts longer. Also important for lead-acid to fully charge it, so extra PV helps.

A couple of expensive brands do the same a different way. Victron uses a battery shunt and tells the charge controller to adjust its output. My SMA has PV inverters that produce AC, while the battery inverter charges at the 0.2C I set and controls the PV inverters. But I think the feature is built in to hybrids, since they already have both systems.

My 5.75kW SMA Sunny Island consumes 25W no-load (625 Wh/day) and has a 6W sleep mode. Many inverters consume much more. A number of them have a sleep mode which would be good.
Best to get "pure sine wave" not "modified sine wave" to power motors like the refrigerator.
 

lou124

New Member
ok thanks, i'll look into what i can get here. quick search yesterday hydrid inverters 1500w were 3 - 4 million idr/ $260 about whereas 2000w were more 5 + million idr/$350. Would that be the price you would pay?

If i had enough money to pay someone to sort it all... it would be easy right, but as i don't i need to learn and understand this to a point
 

Hedges

I See Electromagnetic Fields!
I haven't dabbled in the low-cost end since I threw in my "cheapskate" towel.
I've been buying expensive stuff new, or formerly expensive stuff used.
My battery inverters have list price of $1/watt but I got a liquidation deal at $0.25/watt, and PV inverters for $0.10/watt (not hybrid, these two are AC coupled.)

What matters is them holding up for your loads. Some people have had inverters blow up powering a welder, others for no apparent reason.
Maybe if you search this forum and the internet for the models you consider you'll learn something about hem.

Are there any reliable battery powered refrigerators in your area?
 

Yuuki

New Member
Hello there! I am also an Indonesian trying to build a solar system. using slightly smaller model 850 VA, 2 x 150 wp solar panel and 100ah battery.
I am still testing the setup and will expand it if I can figure things out (plus if i have the budget to).

I think your current system is the best best for diy and under 20 million IDR.
this one I mean:
'
solar panel 250w x 4
Inverter 1500va Hybrid Schneider
Luminous Tubular Battery 200ah x 2
combiner box
'
I think the 98 million is a bit overkill haha. They suggest the big luminous inverter, which might be great for 3000w and might be more than enough to support fridge and maybe a lot of your current electricity burden.

for 1500 VA: the no load output is 220v +- 5 V. if that helps
What I don't really understand is the inverter already have controller built in so I don't need another MPPT controller?

I agree it is so confusing and difficult to get stuff here compared to the US/UK/AUS. I am testing my system and probably gonna test them for lamp instead of fridge/water heater.

About the battery, I consulted with some friends who are electrician and they suggested the VLRA/AGM cuz it is low maintenance and better in the long run.

What I am puzzled now is how to start the wiring...
 
Top