SPF 3000TL LVM-ES

Harry E

New Member
Has anyone connected the AC output of the Growatt SPF 3000TL LVM-ES directly to a home's circuit breaker panel? Under features the manual states that "solar and utility grid can power loads at the same time". Also there is a schematic showing the proper way to hook the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES to a home's load. However my contact a Signature Solar says the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES can not be connected directly to a home's CB panel. I emailed Watts247 but have not heard back from them. I have seen several videos' of this unit used off grid but none with it connected to the grid. Any experience using this unit grid tied? I am limited to 12 solar panels so I am unable to create enough power to go off grid.
 

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FilterGuy

What, me worry?
However my contact a Signature Solar says the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES can not be connected directly to a home's CB panel.
I am not sure why he would say that unless he is saying that it can not be connected to the panel at the same time the grid is connected to the panel. With that unit, the grid is hooked to the inverter and the inverter is then hooked to the panel. The internal auto-transfer switch decides what will power the panel.
 

Harry E

New Member
It does not seem practical to have the input to my electrical panel connected to the inverter, it is 200 amp service. I understand that the inverter requires an input from the grid but I thought that was so it could sync to the grid. One of the features claimed for the inverter is that solar and utility grid can power loads at the same time. On another discussion about this unit the individual plugged the output of this inverter into a wall outlet which seems to verify that feature. I would hate to spend money on 2 of these units without being sure.
 

FilterGuy

What, me worry?
It is a hybrid inverter. It can take power from the grid and pass it to it's output but it is not designed to have it's output on the same circuit as the grid.
 

solarstuff

Solar Enthusiast
It is a hybrid inverter. It can take power from the grid and pass it to it's output but it is not designed to have it's output on the same circuit as the grid.
FilterGuy (or anyone), do you know of a setting which prioritizes battery load OVER utility? I set 'sbu' and I also tried setting 'sol' but my 24b 200ah battery is never used. Simply powering a fridge it will work, but the second I start my 1100w microwave, it flips to grid.

The same 200ah battery configured as 12v 400ah had no problem powering my microwave and small loads like the fridge (when compressor not on).

Kind of scratching my head and wondering if I have to disco ac except at night to avoid run-downs on the AGM batteries.
 
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Ron34422

New Member
Has anyone connected the AC output of the Growatt SPF 3000TL LVM-ES directly to a home's circuit breaker panel? Under features the manual states that "solar and utility grid can power loads at the same time". Also there is a schematic showing the proper way to hook the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES to a home's load. However my contact a Signature Solar says the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES can not be connected directly to a home's CB panel. I emailed Watts247 but have not heard back from them. I have seen several videos' of this unit used off grid but none with it connected to the grid. Any experience using this unit grid tied? I am limited to 12 solar panels so I am unable to create enough power to go off grid.
I recently installed the Growatt SPF 3000TL LVM-ES connecting it to a Connecticut 10 circuit transfer switch panel for my AC output that powers my 10 essential circuits in case of a power failure. I can choose 1 to 10 circuits I want to power just by switching each circuit from "Line to GEN"...(Gen being the inverter if the AC output line is plugged in the Generator inlet Box...If the inverter fails I can unplug the Growatt and plug in my 3000W Gen/Inv directly into the Inlet box and use it to power the 10 essential circuits...
 

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coolbz

New Member
Has anyone connected the AC output of the Growatt SPF 3000TL LVM-ES directly to a home's circuit breaker panel? Under features the manual states that "solar and utility grid can power loads at the same time". Also there is a schematic showing the proper way to hook the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES to a home's load. However my contact a Signature Solar says the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES can not be connected directly to a home's CB panel. I emailed Watts247 but have not heard back from them. I have seen several videos' of this unit used off grid but none with it connected to the grid. Any experience using this unit grid tied? I am limited to 12 solar panels so I am unable to create enough power to go off grid.
It will very likely just work, but is not approved by building code.

I also thought of feeding Growatt output into a household outlet, with the breaker of that outlet turned off. That way I don’t have to ru additional wires. It should just work, but very likely against “code”, so in case a fire burn down my house, insurance guy would pick on this and refuse to pay.
 

coolbz

New Member
Has anyone connected the AC output of the Growatt SPF 3000TL LVM-ES directly to a home's circuit breaker panel? Under features the manual states that "solar and utility grid can power loads at the same time". Also there is a schematic showing the proper way to hook the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES to a home's load. However my contact a Signature Solar says the SPF 3000TL LVM-ES can not be connected directly to a home's CB panel. I emailed Watts247 but have not heard back from them. I have seen several videos' of this unit used off grid but none with it connected to the grid. Any experience using this unit grid tied? I am limited to 12 solar panels so I am unable to create enough power to go off grid.

by the way, I have same system connected at home with additional wires to run some appliances, with grid power as a backup in SBU mode. Run extra wires is the most hassle than setting up Growatt.
 

FilterGuy

What, me worry?
Run extra wires is the most hassle than setting up Growatt.
I hear that!!! I have been contemplating some major system changes but getting the wires from the existing breaker box and inverter to the right place for the new inverter and batteries is going to be 95% of the work......
 

NHRenewables

New Member
I’m not sure why everyone is wiling to spend a lot of up front costs for an AIO, and then treating it as a generator. It’s better to consider it a UPS. On my 3 bedroom home, a 3000 watt generator has satisfied my needs during multi week power outages in New Hampshire. No fun filling jerry jugs!
A 3000W AIO will serve all my 120v needs and then some. I run gas appliances for oven and dryer so I have limited 240v needs. Their electrical requirements can run off the AIO too.
All of my 120v circuits are being served by my 3000W LVM. All critical load breakers were relocated from the main panel to a new $80 Siemans subpanel. With a family of 5, I am usually under 1 KW throughout the day.

As long as you monitor your usage, the default settings should satisfy your needs. When / If I need 240v, I’ll purchase a parallel unit to grow. In the end, AIO’s should be a whole house UPS where one should not have to overthink the maintenance.
 

NHRenewables

New Member
People should commit to installing their AIOs to their locality’s respective electrical codes for safety. To be blunt, don’t half-@ss it, electricity is dangerous,

My suggestion is that people install their AIOs as if it’s an enhancement to their main breaker by sizing their AIO purchase to satisfy their home‘s capacity needs. Your battery and solar capacity can be limited to your pocketbook.

Transfer switches are not really needed. If you want that capability, a main breaker lockout and a 240v breaker from a generator can now back feed into slot 1 of the empty main panel when a generator is needed during extended grid outages. To install an AIO, buy the same brand sub panel as your existing main panel, buy 12 feet of required AIO feed line, and relocate breakers and wires of critical circuits.
 

FilterGuy

What, me worry?
People should commit to installing their AIOs to their locality’s respective electrical codes for safety. To be blunt, don’t half-@ss it, electricity is dangerous,

My suggestion is that people install their AIOs as if it’s an enhancement to their main breaker by sizing their AIO purchase to satisfy their home‘s capacity needs. Your battery and solar capacity can be limited to your pocketbook.

Transfer switches are not really needed. If you want that capability, a main breaker lockout and a 240v breaker from a generator can now back feed into slot 1 of the empty main panel when a generator is needed during extended grid outages. To install an AIO, buy the same brand sub panel as your existing main panel, buy 12 feet of required AIO feed line, and relocate breakers and wires of critical circuits.
That is an interesting perspective.

I fully agree that systems should follow code....even if they don't have to. I hate it when I see posts from people that are knowingly or unknowingly doing less.

However, I don't see that the inverter must be large enough to cover all the home's needs. It only needs to be large enough to cover the equipment that they feel they need backup for and can afford to do safely. For some people, that may only be a couple of LED lights. For others it may be the whole house. It is going to depend on a combination of their value set and their budget. True, if the inverter is larger than initially needed, it is easier to grow the system later.....but that is a choice each person makes on their own.

I personally don't want a system that requires me to throw a transfer switch to get power back, but that might not match the value set of others. Just because I would do it one way does not mean people that make different choices are wrong.
 

NHRenewables

New Member
That is an interesting perspective.

I fully agree that systems should follow code....even if they don't have to. I hate it when I see posts from people that are knowingly or unknowingly doing less.

However, I don't see that the inverter must be large enough to cover all the home's needs. It only needs to be large enough to cover the equipment that they feel they need backup for and can afford to do safely. For some people, that may only be a couple of LED lights. For others it may be the whole house. It is going to depend on a combination of their value set and their budget. True, if the inverter is larger than initially needed, it is easier to grow the system later.....but that is a choice each person makes on their own.

I personally don't want a system that requires me to throw a transfer switch to get power back, but that might not match the value set of others. Just because I would do it one way does not mean people that make different choices are wrong.
I agree with all your points as well. What I don’t understand is the need for additional complexities of installing transfer switches and the like.
 

Ron34422

New Member
That is an interesting perspective.

I fully agree that systems should follow code....even if they don't have to. I hate it when I see posts from people that are knowingly or unknowingly doing less.

However, I don't see that the inverter must be large enough to cover all the home's needs. It only needs to be large enough to cover the equipment that they feel they need backup for and can afford to do safely. For some people, that may only be a couple of LED lights. For others it may be the whole house. It is going to depend on a combination of their value set and their budget. True, if the inverter is larger than initially needed, it is easier to grow the system later.....but that is a choice each person makes on their own.

I personally don't want a system that requires me to throw a transfer switch to get power back, but that might not match the value set of others. Just because I would do it one way does not mean people that make different choices are wrong.
When I finally realized I needed to get serious about a home back up system my steps went kinda like this... (not recommended for everyone)
Buy a big generator and some extension cords... (worked but not very convenient )
Installed a interlock switch and generator breaker in main panel outside on my power pole... (better but still inconvenient in the middle of a storm)
Realized I didn't need to power the entire house during a blackout after I installed the Emporia energy monitoring system (only needed 3000W)
Sold the big generator and bought a 3000W gen/inverter that was much quieter and I could use propane to fuel it (better yet)
More research found the Connecticut Transfer switch panel...(much more convenient inside the garage) powers my essential circuits as I choose...
Light bulb went off one day and I tried an old inverter that I had and plugged into the inlet box on the transfer switch panel powered by some of my electric bike batteries...(just a test)....realized that is much quieter and perfect for a short term outage
Safer LifePo4 batteries for longer power outages...Started looking for a new inverter...
Found the "all in one" inverters and bought a 48V Growatt 3000 ES and plugged into the transfer switch...(very convenient when used on utility/battery backup ...I don't even have to get out of bed during a power failure now)
Why not solar panels to charge those batteries? Installed 15 used panels on top of my pergola for a 3000w array to charge the batteries and power my AC in the garage during the hot hours of the day
No solar?...No Utility?...No problem...I just plug my external battery charger into my Gen/Inv and keep the battery bank charged as needed...
If the inverter crashes I have a backup by unplugging it and plugging in the Gen/Inv directly to power my essential circuits
It's been a learning experience...who knows what might be next?
 

coolbz

New Member
I’m not sure why everyone is wiling to spend a lot of up front costs for an AIO, and then treating it as a generator. It’s better to consider it a UPS. On my 3 bedroom home, a 3000 watt generator has satisfied my needs during multi week power outages in New Hampshire. No fun filling jerry jugs!
A 3000W AIO will serve all my 120v needs and then some. I run gas appliances for oven and dryer so I have limited 240v needs. Their electrical requirements can run off the AIO too.
All of my 120v circuits are being served by my 3000W LVM. All critical load breakers were relocated from the main panel to a new $80 Siemans subpanel. With a family of 5, I am usually under 1 KW throughout the day.

As long as you monitor your usage, the default settings should satisfy your needs. When / If I need 240v, I’ll purchase a parallel unit to grow. In the end, AIO’s should be a whole house UPS where one should not have to overthink the maintenance.

From my perspective, saving money, energy independence and killing time (in a productive way) are 3 main objectives for setting up my AIO system as generator, even though I have relatively stable grid power at home.

Yes, the system seem to have large upfront cost. My AIO plus battery plus wires plus panels costed me about $4000. Although factoring in 26% federal tax credit and my local electricity cost of $0.33+ per kwh, my system can break even in 3 years. This is much better than utilility company's solar system offer which normally break even in 8-10 years, plus their tie-in system can NEVER work during power outage. So my system is FAR better than traditional residential grid-tie solar system. And utility company IS going to increase price over time which makes my system even better. Home users are starting to have option to replace traditional grid power as technology and new products keep improving.

Local government and utility companies will lose taxation power to fund their agenda once people gain energy independence.
 
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FilterGuy

What, me worry?
Local government and utility companies will lose taxation power to fund their agenda once people gain energy independence.
Sadly, some localities are now *requiring* grid connection and minimum payments.....so they are not compleatly loosing the ability to stick it to the independent minded person.
 

coolbz

New Member
Sadly, some localities are now *requiring* grid connection and minimum payments.....so they are not compleatly loosing the ability to stick it to the independent minded person.
What if I don't need grid power and want disconnect completely. Well, I guess big government and monopolized companies always have ways to control people. At least they can control majority of people.:mad:
 
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