Sun GTIL2 1000 Limiter doesnt work

kaizday

New Member
hello,

i have this Sun gtil2 1000w that is supposed to support the limiter, but for some reason, it doesnt appear to be working correctly for me, unless i configured it wrong or misunderstood the number.

my current set up: the limiter goes from Internal to one of the main leg in US 2 phase. the inverter is connected to one of the phase. on the screen, it seems to detect the load need just fine (positive wattage) but it wont limit anything and my Emporia still reports negative number.

as u can see in my setting page, if i dont limit the battery/solar power, it would just dump as much as it can into my circuit.

am i doing something wrong?

tia
 

Attachments

  • 20210925_142528.jpg
    20210925_142528.jpg
    510.4 KB · Views: 4
  • 20210925_142424.jpg
    20210925_142424.jpg
    508.7 KB · Views: 4
  • Screenshot_20210925-145506.jpg
    Screenshot_20210925-145506.jpg
    283.6 KB · Views: 4

fafrd

Solar Addict
hello,

i have this Sun gtil2 1000w that is supposed to support the limiter, but for some reason, it doesnt appear to be working correctly for me, unless i configured it wrong or misunderstood the number.

my current set up: the limiter goes from Internal to one of the main leg in US 2 phase. the inverter is connected to one of the phase. on the screen, it seems to detect the load need just fine (positive wattage) but it wont limit anything and my Emporia still reports negative number.

as u can see in my setting page, if i dont limit the battery/solar power, it would just dump as much as it can into my circuit.

am i doing something wrong?

tia
I believe you’ve got your sensor on the wrong leg (not the same leg you’ve connected the AC output to).

So the sensor is detecting 64W and the GTIL is maxing out at the 220W maximum you’ve specified but dumping it into the other leg so it has no impact on what the clamp sensor is reading.

When I first got my GTIL, I sacrificed an extension cord to experiment. Cut off some insulation so that I could install the sensor around the hot wire and plugged the GTIL into the end of the cord. Then, by plugging in various appliances such as hair dryers and space heaters, I was able to watch it do its thing and gain confidence before booking it up into my breaker panel.

Another issue I’ve run into is that some appliance cords switch hot and neutral. Not a biggie - you’ll just see negative AC power and need to reverse the direction of your clamp sensor.

Also, I assume you know your settings impose a 220W upper limit on output power. To get up to the ~850W maximum output capability of a 1000W G2, you’ll want to uncheck that lower left box…
 

kaizday

New Member
I believe you’ve got your sensor on the wrong leg (not the same leg you’ve connected the AC output to).

So the sensor is detecting 64W and the GTIL is maxing out at the 220W maximum you’ve specified but dumping it into the other leg so it has no impact on what the clamp sensor is reading.

When I first got my GTIL, I sacrificed an extension cord to experiment. Cut off some insulation so that I could install the sensor around the hot wire and plugged the GTIL into the end of the cord. Then, by plugging in various appliances such as hair dryers and space heaters, I was able to watch it do its thing and gain confidence before booking it up into my breaker panel.

Another issue I’ve run into is that some appliance cords switch hot and neutral. Not a biggie - you’ll just see negative AC power and need to reverse the direction of your clamp sensor.

Also, I assume you know your settings impose a 220W upper limit on output power. To get up to the ~850W maximum output capability of a 1000W G2, you’ll want to uncheck that lower left box…

thank you very much. i dont know where i got the idea that the leg side doesn't matter so i never tried. and yep, you are correct, changed the CT to the other leg and it appears to work now.

and yea, i set the upper limit because the limiter didn't work. all good now. thanks so much again!!!
 

fafrd

Solar Addict
thank you very much. i dont know where i got the idea that the leg side doesn't matter so i never tried. and yep, you are correct, changed the CT to the other leg and it appears to work now.

and yea, i set the upper limit because the limiter didn't work. all good now. thanks so much again!!!
Do you have a second 1000W model or just the one?
 

kaizday

New Member
Do you have a second 1000W model or just the one?

i only have one right now, just wanted to see how well it works. how's about you? and are you running it off a battery or straight from PV? i am thinking of building a 24v pack, still trying to find a good aliexpress seller.
 

fafrd

Solar Addict
i only have one right now, just wanted to see how well it works. how's about you? and are you running it off a battery or straight from PV? i am thinking of building a 24v pack, still trying to find a good aliexpress seller.
I’ve got two and just hooked them up to my 24V LiFePO4 battery - works like a charm.

Who knows yet about reliability / lifetime, but so far, my only gripes are that the efficiency is piss-poor (~80%) and the frequently-fired fans are loud (even at modest output levels).

But ease-of-wiring makes these an absolutely fantastic product class.
 

kaizday

New Member
I’ve got two and just hooked them up to my 24V LiFePO4 battery - works like a charm.

Who knows yet about reliability / lifetime, but so far, my only gripes are that the efficiency is piss-poor (~80%) and the frequently-fired fans are loud (even at modest output levels).

But ease-of-wiring makes these an absolutely fantastic product class.

yeah, i agree with all of your assessment.

another question for you, what protection devices do you have for your setup? i see that a lot of people invested in SPD for both AC and DC sides but i also see that many ppl dont have any. Especially for a battery based like yours and mine, i m curious if a DC SPD needed?
 

fafrd

Solar Addict
I’ve got a pretty sweet setup.

BMS is always there as fallback protection at the cell level (disconnects battery negative).

Then the GTILs run out of steam well above an 8S LiFePO4 empty battery level (and can be programmed to stop even higher).

Then my Epever has a programmable relay that I’ve set to stop discharge at the minimum level I want to discharge the battery to (~15%) - this controls a cheap 23V/120V relay I hooked up. That first relay also has a timer which I’ve set to Peak Hours, so unless the battery never charged up enough to make it worthwhile, the first relay will fire up the inverters at the beginning of Peak Period and discharge until the end of Peak Period or the battery reaches the Low Voltage Limit I’ve set, whichever comes first.

Then the Epever has a second programmable relay I’ve set for higher voltage levels to avoid the battery ever getting fully charged (clear sunny high-output days). When the battery charges to ~50% full, that second relay will fire up the GTILs through a second relay no matter what time it is (and stop if battery discharges to the ‘Reserve Voltage’ level I’ve set - the charge I want to reserve for Peak Period).

So yeah, I’m using a pair of contact-type relays not to protect the battery in any way but to program/control the GTIL to turn on only during periods to realize my goals (maximize discharge during Peak Hours and start discharge during non-Peak hours whenever there is enough incoming charge to push the battery above ~50% full).

The way these GTILs just plug into an outlet makes it very easy - I just built a dual-phase (L1 on left, L2 on right) ‘smart outlet’ that contains both relays so L1/N and L2/N only reaches the 2 GTILs when my Epever charge controller wants discharge to begin.

[PS. I considered SPDs (which I use for my electric home brewing setup) but chose contact relays instead because of the efficiency loss and heat generation associated with SPDs.

Contact relays have much lower resistance than SPDs but won’t deliver anywhere near the same lifetime (switching cycles).

For electric brewing where you’ll need to switch ~1000s of times per brew session, SPDs are definitely the better choice.

But for solar power generation, where each contactor will only switch once per day, contractors are the better choice.]
 
Top