Water pump for cabin

Barridge

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Nov 7, 2020
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Hi Guys, I'm looking for some ideas on pumping water throughout my cabin.
I am currently using a 12v ShurFlow Pump. I am converting my system to 24v, buying a larger battery bank, Larger inverter.
Does anyone have an idea as to what is more efficient?
Keep my 12v pump and buy a step down converter.
Or, buy a 24v pump.
Or buy a 120v pump and run it off the inverter?

Thank you!
 

Don B. Cilly

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Aug 24, 2021
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Mallorca ES
I have a Seaflo, 24V. Paid €100 for it. Plus €33 for the accumulator tank.
Very good pressure, reasonable draw. I'm quite happy with it.

[EDIT] Obviously, that is the most efficient setup. But if you're happy with your current pump, a decent PWM converter won't make much difference, and you can use it for other things.
-
 
Last edited:

Barridge

New Member
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Nov 7, 2020
Messages
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I have a Seaflo, 24V. Paid €100 for it. Plus €33 for the accumulator tank.
Very good pressure, reasonable draw. I'm quite happy with it.

[EDIT] Obviously, that is the most efficient setup. But if you're happy with your current pump, a decent PWM converter won't make much difference, and you can use it for other things.
-
Your are right about using it for other things also. I think I might go that route since I have 2 - 12v pumps.
When I need to purchase another pump I can buy a 24v pump and keep the converter for other applications if needed.
Thank you!
 

MichaelK

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Mar 21, 2020
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The biggest Shurflow pump I've seen has a rated maximum of 10amps, so I think this 20A converter would be your cheapest implementation strategy.
1641491559969.png
 

chocoheadfred

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Joined
Oct 25, 2021
Messages
21
Hi Guys, I'm looking for some ideas on pumping water throughout my cabin.
I am currently using a 12v ShurFlow Pump. I am converting my system to 24v, buying a larger battery bank, Larger inverter.
Does anyone have an idea as to what is more efficient?
Keep my 12v pump and buy a step down converter.
Or, buy a 24v pump.
Or buy a 120v pump and run it off the inverter?

Thank you!
Are you happy with your current 12v ShurFlow Pump? Just interested. I'm getting ready to install a 12V pump I got from Northern Tool. It's 6 GPM and seems to be pretty beefy (as I my last one wasn't working well). Thanks.
 

Wellbuilt

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893
I use a shurflow park model it’s 110 v and runs off my inverter .
They are made to last longer then the 12v units mine is going on 4 years old now .
 

Barridge

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Nov 7, 2020
Messages
28
Are you happy with your current 12v ShurFlow Pump? Just interested. I'm getting ready to install a 12V pump I got from Northern Tool. It's 6 GPM and seems to be pretty beefy (as I my last one wasn't working well). Thanks.
Yes I am very happy with it. My is a 4 amp 2.8 gpm. I have a spare pump I bought for a back up and its a lot quieter then the one I'm using now.
 

Wellbuilt

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Messages
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I think it’s about the same as far as pumping water, but the inverter uses a little power .
I leave my inverter on all the time so it’s no big deal , it seams to use 100watt pumping as far as I can tell I never checked the 12volt pump .
My cabin has 3 3 fixture bath rooms kitchen sink DW and Landry .
I can use 2 fixtures at once
 

Checkthisout

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The nice thing about the 120v pump is that it's flow is always the same regardless of battery voltage. A battery connected pump has fluctuating output depending on battery voltage.
 

Barridge

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Nov 7, 2020
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I hooked a air pressure tank up to the water system so it gives me constant flow. When the pressure tank is full the pump doesn't run. Once the tank pressure drops the pump kicks in and there is no drop in pressure.
 

Barridge

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Messages
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I hooked a air pressure tank up to the water system so it gives me constant flow. When the pressure tank is full the pump doesn't run. Once the tank pressure drops the pump kicks in and there is no drop in pressure.
I will see a drop in water pressure when using 2 water fixtures.....
 

Barridge

New Member
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Nov 7, 2020
Messages
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The biggest Shurflow pump I've seen has a rated maximum of 10amps, so I think this 20A converter would be your cheapest implementation strategy.
View attachment 78580
Thank you for the eBay link!
 

12VoltInstalls

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I will see a drop in water pressure when using 2 water fixtures.....
Not meaning to be difficult but why is that a problem for a cabin? Barely 100 years ago running water under pressure was just going mainstream! Have we evolved to a level of softness that minor inconveniences for a cabin are intolerable?! Besides, at a given flow how is it that an appropriate 12V pump can’t pressurize in operation with an air tank or diaphragm tank? [/rant]
Does anyone have an idea as to what is more efficient?
the 12V pump is likely more efficient in a couple of perspectives, the 24V is more electrically efficient over “x” feet of wire, a 120V pump has less cable loss but you have inverter heat and related electrical ‘loss’ to factor for including accommodations for startup surge. A big ‘expansion tank’ with adjustment of the pressure switch in a 12V pump would probably be indiscernible from a 120V pump unless a diaphragm tank is not used and you are relying strictly on demand flow.
 

Checkthisout

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Not meaning to be difficult but why is that a problem for a cabin? Barely 100 years ago running water under pressure was just going mainstream! Have we evolved to a level of softness that minor inconveniences for a cabin are intolerable?! Besides, at a given flow how is it that an appropriate 12V pump can’t pressurize in operation with an air tank or diaphragm tank? [/rant]

the 12V pump is likely more efficient in a couple of perspectives, the 24V is more electrically efficient over “x” feet of wire, a 120V pump has less cable loss but you have inverter heat and related electrical ‘loss’ to factor for including accommodations for startup surge. A big ‘expansion tank’ with adjustment of the pressure switch in a 12V pump would probably be indiscernible from a 120V pump unless a diaphragm tank is not used and you are relying strictly on demand flow.
Yes we have gone soft. I want to be able to do laundry, take a shower and have a toilet flushed without a big pressure drop.

I run two seaflow adjustable bypass pumps with no pressure tank.

It's nice. The difference in flow while the batteries are charging at 14.4 volts vs depleted at 12.2 is huge!
 

12VoltInstalls

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The difference in flow while the batteries are charging at 14.4 volts vs depleted at 12.2 is huge!
The old style bladderless expansion tank method can be utilized to mitigate this by using 36” 6- or 8” diameter pipe for an air reservoir. Expense wise, it’s only $40 for a bladder/diaphragm tank.
 

Checkthisout

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The old style bladderless expansion tank method can be utilized to mitigate this by using 36” 6- or 8” diameter pipe for an air reservoir. Expense wise, it’s only $40 for a bladder/diaphragm tank.

My lack of experience with pressure tanks though, I was/am worried I wouldn't be able to drain it full and it might freeze. Maybe that's a non issue.
 

MichaelK

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Not meaning to be difficult but why is that a problem for a cabin? Barely 100 years ago running water under pressure was just going mainstream! Have we evolved to a level of softness that minor inconveniences for a cabin are intolerable?! Besides, at a given flow how is it that an appropriate 12V pump can’t pressurize in operation with an air tank or diaphragm tank? [/rant]
When I first starting building my cabin, I started referring it as being up to 18th century standards with wood heat, then 19th century standards with a running water, then 20th century standards when I had a flush toilet, hot/cold running water, and electricity. Getting the TV antenna was a big milestone because it started to remove the dire threat of AED (acute electronic deprivation). AED had to be taken very seriously. In teenagers, it can be fatal!

I can still remember the evening I spilled boiling water on my foot, that I had heated on the woodstove, as I was carrying it to the bathtub. So yes, I really don't want to live again without hot running water.
 
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