diy solar

diy solar

What was your most interesting recent non solar project?

I don't like the idea of a solid linkage from breach to shoulder or wrist.
Would rather it had some travel, then a spring to return.

Would you rather ride a hard tail, or something with full suspension?
 
:unsure: we will revisit that answer when you have gotten 10 years older and your joints are all worn out :eek::eek::eek:
A 10 round mag and your shoulder is about done.

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:unsure: we will revisit that answer when you have gotten 10 years older and your joints are all worn out :eek::eek::eek:
A 10 round mag and your shoulder is about done
I would imagine, the only long gun I have ever fired other than an M-16a1 and a2 was a 12 gauge shotgun, I would guess that your rifle probably is somewhere close to that. yes? no?
 
Unfortunately not, i dont have olive trees of my own, but anybody that has 15 - 20 trees usually does. I was the guy doing it for the country hotels i worked for years ago. After harvesting them with a group of flunkies i just brought them to the 'frantoio', a small business with all the equipment to do cold extraction of oil from olives, and you pay them a fee derived from the weight of the olives he processed for you.
 
Unfortunately not, i dont have olive trees of my own, but anybody that has 15 - 20 trees usually does. I was the guy doing it for the country hotels i worked for years ago. After harvesting them with a group of flunkies i just brought them to the 'frantoio', a small business with all the equipment to do cold extraction of oil from olives, and you pay them a fee derived from the weight of the olives he processed for you.
I wish I could grow an olive tree...maybe inside my Greenhouse. :unsure:
 
How deep did you make the hole underneath? I worked as a gardener for 7 years and i used to plant olive trees. I used a mini excavator because they insisted we dig holes at least 120 cm deep (around 4 feet). It helped greatly the development of that tree in the first two years, making it reach a bigger size much earlier.
I planted them where the dirt line was on them, they had dirt on the stems.
I dug my hole about 2ft by 2ft and put in some nicer dirt, but the tiny root mass I got probably only went like 8 inches... hence the huge amount of hay on top to keep moisture higher
generally mycorrhiza fungus seems to make the biggest difference early on
 
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Making big trellis thing's footers.
Growing hardy kiwis / kiwi berry / arctic kiwi (all 3 are same thing), planted behind this post there. That's a temporary cedar log cut from the end of my 9ft tree/log I'll be putting here after the concrete footer dries
The vines can get a few hundred pounds, can grow pretty much anywhere in USA & Europe so worth checking out if you like kiwi flavor in grape form.
Just found out about them a few months ago
 
London England is further North than my location, but they don't see -40 degree winter!
Latitude is not actually a very good proxy for temperatures.
Oh wow! -40 degree winter is something else! Olive trees dont survive that, to be honest i dont know how many species of trees can survive that, specially when they are small.
 
Oh wow! -40 degree winter is something else! Olive trees dont survive that, to be honest i dont know how many species of trees can survive that, specially when they are small.
conifers hahaha
pretty much why taiga / the boreal forest is only a few types of tree.

As for fruiting only one that could survive it that I know of is the pawpaw tree, which goes entirely dormant, probably need heavy mulching. A good layer of snow to insulate them helps too
 
Oh wow! -40 degree winter is something else! Olive trees dont survive that, to be honest i dont know how many species of trees can survive that, specially when they are small.
The natural trees on my property are pines, spruce fir, cedar, ash, poplar, birch, larch, maples willows elm and cherry.
The previous owner planted apple trees, and I may plant a few more for pies.

Edit: and my neighbour has pear & plumb trees they planted seem to do well.

In my post I wondered if an olive could grow in my Greenhouse - but looking up the size of a fully grown Olive tree, too big,
 
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conifers hahaha
pretty much why taiga / the boreal forest is only a few types of tree.

As for fruiting only one that could survive it that I know of is the pawpaw tree, which goes entirely dormant, probably need heavy mulching. A good layer of snow to insulate them helps too
Apple trees can be quite cold hardy. The Macintosh Apple originated in Canada and I have seen them survive -36F without any damage. Duchess of Oldenburg is reported to be hardy to zone 2, but I do not have any personal experience with that variety. There are more apple varieties hardy to zone 3.
Some Plum and Pear trees are also hardy at those temperatures.
I would not be surprised if there are some cherry varieties that would work as well.
 
The natural trees on my property are pines, spruce fir, cedar, ash, birch, larch, maples and willows elm and cherry.
The previous owner planted apple trees, and I may plant a few more for pies.

Edit: and my neighbour has pear trees they planted seem to do well.

In my post I wondered if an olive could grow in my Greenhouse - but looking up the size of a fully grown Olive tree, too big,
Next project then:
AI does not understand that there is not supposed to be snow inside of the greenhouse 😅
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Making big trellis thing's footers.
Growing hardy kiwis / kiwi berry / arctic kiwi (all 3 are same thing), planted behind this post there. That's a temporary cedar log cut from the end of my 9ft tree/log I'll be putting here after the concrete footer dries
The vines can get a few hundred pounds, can grow pretty much anywhere in USA & Europe so worth checking out if you like kiwi flavor in grape form.
Just found out about them a few months ago
I grew a variety of arctic kiwi about 40 years ago. The vines grew very fast and were very healthy. They flowered well and set fruit, but for some reason the fruit would drop off the vine well before reaching maturity. I was never able to determine the cause. Very disappointing to lose hundreds of pounds of fruit every year.

The vines grow larger and thicker each year. They will destroy all but the strongest of lattice work. I had to rebuild my lattice after I discovered how they grew. I would suggest nothing less than a 2" x 2". The vines are similar to oriental bittersweet or a very vigorous wisteria, if you are familiar with those plants.
 
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