Why does Will Prowse suggest not using load output ports on the EPEVER MPPT Solar Charge Controller?

GGameBoy

New Member
I have watched many of Will Prowse videos on YouTube and he never recommends using the load ports on the solar charge controllers and in fact he suggests against it but leaves no explanation why, At least that I have seen.

My understanding of load ports on solar charge controllers is that the power comes directly from the solar panels to the load and thus potentially saves battery cycles and increasing battery life. Is this correct? If so I can’t see why he does not recommend using the ports.

I know on this 40 amp mppt solar charge controller the load ports r only 20 amps at 12 volts but that’s still up to 240 watts per hour that is not being cycled by the batteries.
 

snoobler

Solar Honey Badger
Moderator
I have watched many of Will Prowse videos on YouTube and he never recommends using the load ports on the solar charge controllers and in fact he suggests against it but leaves no explanation why, At least that I have seen.

My understanding of load ports on solar charge controllers is that the power comes directly from the solar panels to the load and thus potentially saves battery cycles and increasing battery life. Is this correct? If so I can’t see why he does not recommend using the ports.

I know on this 40 amp mppt solar charge controller the load ports r only 20 amps at 12 volts but that’s still up to 240 watts per hour that is not being cycled by the batteries.

Your understanding is incorrect. Load ports are battery voltage. They vary with the battery. If there is solar available, then the device's load on the battery, and the subsequent drop in voltage will be compensated for by the solar. This behavior is IDENTICAL if the load is attached AT the battery or AT the load ports.

Think of load ports as a different place to connect to the battery that may have additional programmable functions.

A load port has the following advantages vs. direct connect to battery:
  1. May offer a timer function to allow the load to be turned on and off on a schedule.
  2. May offer low and high voltage disconnect to protect the device from high voltage or the battery from excessive discharge through the load port.
The biggest disadvantage is they are generally limited to a much lower current.
 

MrNatural22

🌞SW sunshine =⚡️⚡️lit up thru the darkness✌️
I only use the load port on my EPever to program on/off low current LED outside lights. 1-3a X 2 it also gives a dusk to dawn feature if prefered.
My other CC is a Victron 100/30 and there are no load ports, so I use an inexpensive small timer connected direct to the battery for lights on that CC.
 

GGameBoy

New Member
Your understanding is incorrect. Load ports are battery voltage. They vary with the battery. If there is solar available, then the device's load on the battery, and the subsequent drop in voltage will be compensated for by the solar. This behavior is IDENTICAL if the load is attached AT the battery or AT the load ports.

Think of load ports as a different place to connect to the battery that may have additional programmable functions.

A load port has the following advantages vs. direct connect to battery:
  1. May offer a timer function to allow the load to be turned on and off on a schedule.
  2. May offer low and high voltage disconnect to protect the device from high voltage or the battery from excessive discharge through the load port.
The biggest disadvantage is they are generally limited to a much lower current.
Thank you! That explains a lot.
 

12VoltInstalls

Solar Enthusiast
The ‘load’ output terminals can be connected to a NO or NC 12V relay to utilize the ‘sunset’ or low voltage cutout features of certain charge controllers.
That could be a handy way of doing a number of switching tasks automatically.

I think the primary reason to not use the load outputs is the low 20A capacity still needs fuse panel to be safe. A decent fuse panel could handle / distribute 40, 60, or 100A...
A second reason is why would you want to put 20A of load that’s potentially creating heat in the charge controller?
A third obvious reason is with an inverter the amp load is huge. A 1200W inverter running a 600W coffeemaker for example is at least 50A. That needs fat cables- big gauge 250A cables - (I used 2/0) hooked to the battery, not 10ga wires from a charge controller.
 

fratermus

Solar Enthusiast
The ‘load’ output terminals can be connected to a NO or NC 12V relay to utilize the ‘sunset’ or low voltage cutout features of certain charge controllers.
That could be a handy way of doing a number of switching tasks automatically.
I do this as a crude way to energize an opportunity circuit. LOAD -> [timer long enough that the Vabs is likely to be achieved] -> relay
 

Substrate

Solar Addict
To be sure, it's not just Will Prowse, nor is this limited to the EPEVER. Pretty much standard operations across the board in solar, but it is common for many to not use the load ports properly when starting out.
 
Top