Winston 260Ah vs EVE 280Ah

Adrian R

New Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
Messages
16
Hi,

I just read the specs - Winston LiYfePO4 260Ah is about 9 kgs
EVE LiFePO4 280Ah only 5.2 kgs?

Yes, EVE is cheaper

But is it worth the price difference vs quality drop?

Has anyone made a comparison test?
 

curiouscarbon

Science Penguin
Joined
Jun 29, 2020
Messages
1,555
Hi Adrian,

Welcome to the forum ☀️

I too would like to see a comparison test of Winston LiYFePO4 and EVE LiFePO4 cells

EVE cells seem reliable if operated within parameters, but probably much higher incidence of manufacturing defects than Winston. Full disclosure I have no hands on experience with EVE or Winston cells.

Winston cells are like spaceship to me
EVE cells are like strong horse to me

maybe none of this makes sense, hopefully your project goes well 🙂🖖
 

Adrian R

New Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
Messages
16
thank you!

i have been using Winston for 3 years now (8 pieces of 400Ah) on an Electrodacus sbms120 cc
very pleased with them. but they are expensive

i am considering EVE for new projects, price is very tempting but not sure of their quality!
 

Ampster

Renewable Energy Hobbyist
Joined
May 3, 2020
Messages
4,366
Location
Sonoma, California
Ten years ago I bought seventy five 100 Ahr Winstons for a VW conversion project. I sold the car a few years later and the batteries were working fine. Back then the price was almost $400 per kWh.
 

curiouscarbon

Science Penguin
Joined
Jun 29, 2020
Messages
1,555
with the EVE 280Ah cells it is important to have a sound plan for the terminals.

they are made out of aluminum and many people have reported issues with getting enough force to adequately hold the busbar against the terminal for lower resistance, while at the same time not causing the (relatively) soft aluminum terminal to deform too much. that is the primary factor in why i have avoided purchasing EVE or lishen or whatever brand 280Ah cells. the terminal connection aspect. this lead me to the 100Ah Frey cells because of the stud connection, it allows me to be very unintelligent (relatively speaking) while connecting.

AFAIK as long as you constrain the EVE cells perpendicular to the largest face (to prevent expansion and contraction of the face leading to fatigue of container) things should work great! Terminals and Compression/Fixture/Constraint are the Two Major factors of success when using EVE 280Ah cells from my reading this forum.
 
Last edited:

Globo

New Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
26
Do the Winston look like old cells, old projects like the Calb with very bulky and heavy casings, prehistory brought back into vogue thanks to the magic formula (yttrium) which will then really serve something inside the cells? a lot of publicity little diffusion, the world uses Catl Eve Lishen Rept etc. etc.
 

Adrian R

New Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
Messages
16
Yeah, only 400Ah, 700Ah and 1000Ah like nobody else is making, and strong connectors too. Are you guys still struggling with the M6 bolts and nuts ha ha?
 

Globo

New Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
26
Yeah, only 400Ah, 700Ah and 1000Ah like nobody else is making, and strong connectors too. Are you guys still struggling with the M6 bolts and nuts ha ha?
Connectors are history too, the best current connections are soldered
 

toms

Solar Addict
Joined
Jul 24, 2020
Messages
737
It is a good question, i’m curious to see how long the EVE / Lishen / CATL style cells last.

Winston have proven to last over a decade in off-grid system use.
 

RCinFLA

Photon Sorcerer
Joined
Jun 21, 2020
Messages
1,026
Winston are thinner electrode design with higher peak current capability.

They can handle about 4x continuous current over EVA's.

That is why they are popular with EV folks.
 

Ampster

Renewable Energy Hobbyist
Joined
May 3, 2020
Messages
4,366
Location
Sonoma, California
Winston are thinner electrode design with higher peak current capability.

They can handle about 4x continuous current over EVA's.
My recollection of my Winstons and Thunderakys was that the volumetric density was a lot less than my EVE cells, Maybe part of that is the thinner shell but is there another explanation?
 

Globo

New Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
26
Il mio ricordo dei miei Winston e Thunderaky era che la densità volumetrica era molto inferiore a quella delle mie cellule EVE, forse parte di questo è il guscio più sottile, ma c'è un'altra spiegazione?
old projects
 

RCinFLA

Photon Sorcerer
Joined
Jun 21, 2020
Messages
1,026
My recollection of my Winstons and Thunderakys was that the volumetric density was a lot less than my EVE cells, Maybe part of that is the thinner shell but is there another explanation?
Thinner electrodes means thinner graphite on anode, thinner LFP on cathode. It reduces ion diffusion resistance at high current. Thick electrodes decreases cell current rate where layer ion starvation becomes significant. Thicker electrodes and ion starvation increases cell loss at high current, with greater terminal voltage slump at high current.

The AH capacity of a cell is based on amount of LFP in cathode and corresponding ratio amount of graphite in anode, Thinner electrodes means to get similar capacity there must be more layer area and/or more layers, with more corresponding copper and alumimum foil along with additional separator material soaked with electrolyte. All this cost more to manufacture cell.

The extra copper, aluminum foil and separator/electrolyte material takes up more volume and adds weight.

Highest peak current cells have about 20 um thick electrodes. Fat electrode cell design, to maximize AH's for given size and weight, are in the 120-150 um thickness range. Copper and aluminum foil is typically in 20-25 um thickness range.

My guess for Winston cells based on their peak current capability, the electrodes are in the 50-75 um range.

EVA design is based on 'AH' number sells cells so maximize AH at lowest manufacturing cost. Okay, but should not use them above 0.5 CA continuous discharge current rate. With 120-150 um electrode, layer ion starvation starts to get significant above about 0.5 CA current rate.
 
Last edited:

DJSmiley

Solar Addict
Joined
Aug 13, 2020
Messages
409
Winstons are more rugged, depending on the location of installation this might be a +

Also: They are LiFeYPO, not LiFePO. Slightly difference, slighly difference voltages (if I remember correctly 2.8V/ 3.3V / 3.8V max vs 2.5/ 3.2 / 3.65V)

Also: The allow charging at lower temperatures (below freezing), unlike LiFePO4 cells.

If size/weight isn't an issue, I would prefer Winston above any prismatic cell.
 
Top