Stalling Issue on turbine

The SSR looks interseting but I know the turbine will put out more than 60v. something like this maybe better? 250VDC at 40 amps? I know its a bit overkill, but since this imported stuff has a high failure rate, staying away from full scale operation might make it last longer?
What would I trigger the relay with? I could parallel the turbine feed, but that would kick it in too low (3v?) The minimum voltage doesnt seem to be adjustable. I could use a solar panel (I have some 100w panels around) that would kick in around 20v or so, but only during the day.
An old school centrifugal rev limiter would work well, very steampunk.
That high unloaded voltage might be problematic for the solid state relay across terminals 4 and 3.
This is a rough draft of a circuit if you want to sketch it up. I would test it on a bench not using the generator or your AGM cells to confirm polarity's are correct and the circuit functions correctly.
I've used alligator clip leads and 9 volt batteries, small chargers etc. in the past to test things.

Remove the turbine positive wire from the battery and connect to SSR terminal 2.
Connect new wire (same size) between SSR terminal 1 and the battery positive terminal.
Run small light gage wire between SSR terminal 4 and battery negative terminal. (insert 1 amp or less fuse)
The control circuitry (voltage divider or variable resistor) would connect between terminal 2 and 3.
Terminal 3 and 4 is internally optically isolated. I wish the milliamps thru it at 30 volts were listed.
This would make the resistor calculation easier. If the sun shines here on Saturday, I will measure the one I am using.
The SSR is designed so that terminals 4-3 and 1-2 are isolated from each other by separate voltages. I am not sure they have to be as the input is optical. They would not be isolated when connecting terminals 2 and 3 (and resistors) to make this work. The potential for over 30 volts being applied across terminals 1 and 2 is there, but it might never get to that level if terminals 1-2 internal switching happens fast enough. One possibility is to set that dump load controller to around 25 volts and connect it across the turbine terminals but... I don't know if your dump load controller can take that voltage and if the dump load solenoid can act fast enough. Since there is a risk of the SSR being damage during trial runs, I suggest putting a small 1 amp or less fuse in the wire between the battery negative and terminal 4 in case the SSR fails. Also heat sink the SSR. Some come with them. The faster they switch the hotter they get.

Permanent magnet generators can generate deadly voltage if they becomes open circuit or under loaded for any reason. Always use
caution, wear insulated gloves, don't ground yourself etc. and meters and leads rated for that voltage.
 

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You might not need to try the above. After completing the light bulb test, replace it with the 2nd dump load resistor you have.
Not the most efficient but nice and simple. There is some value of resistor out there that will make this work. You might even consider nichrome wire from Amazon. You can buy it by the roll. I've made high wattage resistors to load test batteries in the past at specific current values.
 
Just waiting on some wind. Very still here last few days, but storm approaching up the coast will probably hit me with medium SE winds, so I have made sure the turbine has that quadrant covered. Normally it is pinned NW for the winter season as that is where our prevailing winds originate.
 
Well, after no wind for a few days, a quik front came through (at night in the rain of course), I got some video, definitely spun up quick and started really humming, wind didnt last long, but much better action than before. This was with the 40w bulb in the line. Couldnt get a read on the voltage, I need to disconnect some feed lines for that. Will make that connection tomorrow. Will process the video monday and see what the rpm was, but it was spinning like it did during testing. I would guess about 100-120 rpm, but we will see. No idea on the wind speed, it was running about 4 mph today, not enough to start it until that front blew in.
If I splice in a digital volt gage will it (the wire) handle the voltage? Its only small gage wire as opposed to the 10mm feed, no idea of amp levels.
 
If I splice in a digital volt gage will it (the wire) handle the voltage? Its only small gage wire as opposed to the 10mm feed, no idea of amp levels.
Yes.
Voltage is the rating of the insulation not the conductor. The current your meter draws should be in the milliamps range. As long as the meter can handle the voltage that should be fine.
 
Great ! Don't worry what the voltage value is at this point. Only need to confirm some current is flowing. I think it will be 1 amp or less.
Set the meter to amps first and put the meter leads in series with either the positive or negative charging wire. In your photo, it looks easy to do at the terminal block or battery . If you have an ohm meter, see what the resistance of one of your dump load resistors is. Might try that instead of the bulb next. Disconnect wire from one end of the resistor before measuring.
 
Good, thanks guys, will set up something today. Stll predawn at the moment, but looks like a low wind day ahead.
Also of note, I fixed one of the solar panels that feed those batteries and hooked it back up, so batteries were fully charged by nightfall, that may have also been a contributing factor, although the single panel had been keeping the voltage in the 13's during the day, (float), but adding the other panel back in brought it into absorption at 14.4 for awhile.
Will check the ohms on the dump as well today.
 
Could I use this meter (blue digital volt display) by jumping it parallel to feed line? The red jumper with alligator clip is on the feed from the turbine to the block, I could move the white jumper from the negative side to the other side of the block opposite the red jumper, this would be in parallel with the feed. I assume this would show voltage once voltage is flowing, although probably not until it exceeds battery voltage. Or does it really need to be a serial connection?
Getting to the amps after this.
Dump load ohm is 1.1 with feed turned off at breaker for that load. (the add-on dump load)
Amperage would have to be read with feed disconnected and turbine spinning, this will take some engineering as I have no disconnects on the feed side, and unloading the turbine in the wind is dicey. Will dig around and see what I have in the spare parts bin. I do have a clamp meter, couldnt I just read the amps directly with that?
 

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Could I use this meter (blue digital volt display) by jumping it parallel to feed line? The red jumper with alligator clip is on the feed from the turbine to the block, I could move the white jumper from the negative side to the other side of the block opposite the red jumper, this would be in parallel with the feed. I assume this would show voltage once voltage is flowing, although probably not until it exceeds battery voltage. Or does it really need to be a serial connection?
Getting to the amps after this.
Dump load ohm is 1.1 with feed turned off at breaker for that load. (the add-on dump load)
Amperage would have to be read with feed disconnected and turbine spinning, this will take some engineering as I have no disconnects on the feed side, and unloading the turbine in the wind is dicey. Will dig around and see what I have in the spare parts bin. I do have a clamp meter, couldnt I just read the amps directly with that?
I should have asked earlier if you had one of those. Clamp meter is better as long at it can read low values.
 
Could I use this meter (blue digital volt display) by jumping it parallel to feed line?
I see no reason to move those leads.

Amperage would have to be read with feed disconnected and turbine spinning,
You will have no current flow (amps) with leads disconnected. If light bulb in series allows turbine to spin you should see voltage and current at battery.
 
During the wind last night, the volts did not increase at all, was still reading battery voltage (13.1), (its on the video) if I remember correctly. Easier for me to use my clamp meter at the inside feeds, as it is usually during heavy rain or heavy snow that the turbine is spinning up nicely, and standing outside in the dark in the rain trying to read a clamp meter is not any fun at all. Currently the voltage meter is connected across the positive and negative feeds, since they connect directly to the battery they read battery voltage, my thought was it would show increased voltage when it spun up to over battery voltage, but I did not see that, so either the resistance is too high (not allowing the voltage through), or the turbine has stopped producing power (damn sparrows!). Will disconnect the feeds and see if I can spin by hand to verify power output.

I didnt mean disconnecting the leads and leaving them, I meant disconnecting and placing the DMM between them, as you indicated "in series with", so I was brainstorming that and how to safely connect and disconnect while power is being applied. I wasn't clear, sorry.
 
During the wind last night, the volts did not increase at all, was still reading battery voltage (13.1), (its on the video) if I remember correctly. Easier for me to use my clamp meter at the inside feeds, as it is usually during heavy rain or heavy snow that the turbine is spinning up nicely, and standing outside in the dark in the rain trying to read a clamp meter is not any fun at all. Currently the voltage meter is connected across the positive and negative feeds, since they connect directly to the battery they read battery voltage, my thought was it would show increased voltage when it spun up to over battery voltage, but I did not see that, so either the resistance is too high (not allowing the voltage through), or the turbine has stopped producing power (damn sparrows!). Will disconnect the feeds and see if I can spin by hand to verify power output.

I didnt mean disconnecting the leads and leaving them, I meant disconnecting and placing the DMM between them, as you indicated "in series with", so I was brainstorming that and how to safely connect and disconnect while power is being applied. I wasn't clear, sorry.
That bulb is a pretty high resistance. I would not expect the battery voltage to rise much. Just trying to confirm it is charging something. This can be done with the clamp on meter if it is DC. An AC clamp on meter will not work. That 1.1 ohm resistor looks to be a pretty good match for the next test. That would be after confirming some current is flowing. Value does not matter, as long as it is something. It likely is milliamps which isn't enough to raise the battery voltage. Once current flow is confirmed, replace the light bulb with one of the load resistors and see what happens.
 
That bulb is a pretty high resistance. I would not expect the battery voltage to rise much. Just trying to confirm it is charging something. This can be done with the clamp on meter if it is DC. An AC clamp on meter will not work. That 1.1 ohm resistor looks to be a pretty good match for the next test. That would be after confirming some current is flowing. Value does not matter, as long as it is something. It likely is milliamps which isn't enough to raise the battery voltage. Once current flow is confirmed, replace the light bulb with one of the load resistors and see what happens.
Another option to stay out of the weather, replace the light bulb with a 20-30 amp screw in fuse if you have one. Put the resistor in series with the battery inside.
 
I did verify that some voltage was being produced (turbine is still internally undamaged), wife spun the blades by hand while I watched the meter, 4-5 volts when spun, so internals are working and functional, no sparrow sabotage.
I think I have one of those fuses, the barn still has a screw in fusebox, so some probably kicking around. Just some rewiring of the big breadboard back inside the barn to put the resistor inline. Will be done this week, storm arriving shortly so sooner I get things inside the better.
Clamp meter does DC, not sure of the resolution though, will check that. If not, my Innova meter will do that.
 
ok, some data and a question - Here is the video link for the test -
I used the video to extract the RPM
AS far as replacing the bulb with a 30 amp fuse, and then adding the resistor inside - if the purpose is to simply bypass the bulb, I had installed the bulb with a jumper set of MC4 connectors, I can simply remove the jumper with the bulb and just reconnect the feed connectors directly as it was.
(That is my question) Can I just reconnect without the bulb jumper line?
I am still adding the extra resistor inside to the feed line. Looks like I have to do that tonite as the storm promises to bring 35-40 mph winds.
Ignore the voltage display at the end, it was not in serial with the feed line, its measuring battery voltage there.
 

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Should be about 50v at 180rpm, 75v at 250rpm. I dont mess with it when its spinning.
 
I believe the purpose was simply to get the resistor inside with the equipment. Much easier to monitor changes that way.
Be careful with those kinds of winds. You may produce some dangerous voltages as you tinker.
That is correct. I assumed the light bulb and socket were outside in the weather.Just trying to allow you to continue without disconnecting it at this time. If it is easy to remove, don't need the light bulb any more. (pending confirmation of at least some current flow with clamp on meter or Innova)
 
ok, feed has been restored to the building, I rewired the spare dump load into the feed line just before the junction block that feeds the batteries and the dump load solenoid. Brought both meters out there and left them by the controllers. Just waiting on the wind now. Expecting 30-40 mph tomorrow, should be interesting. For now, just staining some new traps on the woodstove getting ready for woodchuck season.
Hopefully the wind will be coming from the north, since I limited the rotation, it wont furl if the wind comes from the Southeast, maybe I will cut it loose in the morning, at least one more quadrant t give it some room to furl.
 
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