Problem with Victron Battery Protect

Shane2482

New Member
I know this is a older post. But I've trying to figure this out. Please correct me if I'm wrong but can't you connect the battery protect between the distribution center and your fuse panel. That way the BP can stop power to your DC side and the multiplus can use it's built in bp to stop power to your AC Side.
 

pvnick

New Member
I know this is a older post. But I've trying to figure this out. Please correct me if I'm wrong but can't you connect the battery protect between the distribution center and your fuse panel. That way the BP can stop power to your DC side and the multiplus can use it's built in bp to stop power to your AC Side.
You would think so. That's the configuration I had (I'm using a different inverter though) and mine went up in smoke. Admittedly when I first started using it, I had all of my DC loads connected through the BP including the DC side of my inverter and then I started reading about all of the returned units, and the mention on Will's channel that you can't have an inverter connected to it at all, so, I switched it to control only DC loads that did not include the Inverter (fridge, water pumps, etc) and a month or so after that is when it failed on me.

My suspicion is that the BP either doesn't have over-current protection, or, it does, but they didn't consider short / transient spikes in current which instead of just triggering OCP like you would expect, it just damages it over time until eventually it catches on fire.
 

Shane2482

New Member
You would think so. That's the configuration I had (I'm using a different inverter though) and mine went up in smoke. Admittedly when I first started using it, I had all of my DC loads connected through the BP including the DC side of my inverter and then I started reading about all of the returned units, and the mention on Will's channel that you can't have an inverter connected to it at all, so, I switched it to control only DC loads that did not include the Inverter (fridge, water pumps, etc) and a month or so after that is when it failed on me.

My suspicion is that the BP either doesn't have over-current protection, or, it does, but they didn't consider short / transient spikes in current which instead of just triggering OCP like you would expect, it just damages it over time until eventually it catches on fire.
That's odd I've been watching a series that victron put out. They do a horrible job explaining what they're doing. But from what I can tell is they used 2 BP one from the charge systems to the battery and one from the distribution center to the dc side. Though I may be wrong like I said it's hard to figure out what they're doing.
 

pvnick

New Member
That's odd I've been watching a series that victron put out. They do a horrible job explaining what they're doing. But from what I can tell is they used 2 BP one from the charge systems to the battery and one from the distribution center to the dc side. Though I may be wrong like I said it's hard to figure out what they're doing.
Yes I agree they make it difficult or subtle to know how to use their product "properly", and it's especially frustrating when the "proper" way involves buying more of their products, and the improper way, results in physical damage to the product and more disconcertingly, potentially everything connected to it (I would be less sour if they made it more clear / obvious what all the limitations were).
 
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