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diy solar

My wife hates extension cords please help

Cptx

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Texas
The easiest HOA approved location for me to install 2 series panels run to outside DC disconnect and 20amp DC breaker then drill a hole in the wall to pass PV wires into my Eco Flo Delta Pro was on a south facing roof above the master bedroom.

Yes, I did this when she was out of town six months ago…better to ask for forgiveness.

I have everything in the master bedroom (hardwood floors…no carpet) running off the Eco Flow AC outlet and extension cords.

Yes, she hates it.

What is the easiest option here?

I was thinking short spliced open extension cord from Eco Flo Delta Pro AC out to 12/2 Romex.

Run the 12/2 Romex in the wall and make new outlets labeled separate from the house grid so I don’t get confused which outlets are from the house grid and which are from the Eco Flo


Am I being stupid (again) ?

Is there a better way?

I did also consider making a separate outlet, then long running that outlet all the way to a separate new circuit breaker in the main circuit panel in the garage and then feeding the panel…..but I’m not sure the Eco Flo Delta Pro would sense if the grid is down…and of course I would not want to back feed the grid if it were to be down.
 
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Yes, that last idea above (grid tie the EcoFlo) is not great and not my vision for the Eco Flow Delta Pro…it’s not what I had in mind and am planning a small four parallel panel low wattage micro inverter grid tie with the very little HOA approved (can’t see it from street) roof space I have remaining.

I have seen a work around for the plug Ecoflo into outlet problem with an AC outlet plug AC disconnect switch that does sense when the grid is down and shuts off that AC outlet when the grid is down (the specific name of that plug into outlet AC grid down disconnect escapes me at the moment)
 
Very awesome flanged outlet there.

I should clarify that the EF Delta Pro is inside the master bedroom…I put it behind a recliner…. But of course she can see the thick yellow 10AWG extension cord running off it that goes to a AC surge protector power strip under our bed.
 
I'm a hater of extension leads too.

But I'm a bigger hater of any form of energy storage bigger than a smartphone in a bedroom!! (and I think carefully about smartphones too, but mainly coz the ruddy things pling and ring at the most inopportune moments).

Even the very safe LiFePO4 can go wrong and let all that energy out when it shouldn't. If it should let go, you're not going to be posting here that you had a failure :(
 
you have a recliner in your master bedroom? Me thinks the problem lies in the fact that you are not using the bedroom for the correct purposes... move the recliner, get a larger bed and get to work there young man! she will not notice the cords if you apply yourself properly ;) (joke)

Hmmm, I had massive fun with my Korean ex on a recliner! Note that it was in the lounge mind!
 
Let's not lose sight of my earlier post - Energy storage in a bedroom????
I'm still trying to reconcile this statement with your tagline: "I don't want to know why you can't. I want to know how you can!"

I have never heard of LiFePO4 batteries becoming bombs. Do they? I used to have FLA batteries in my bedroom--never had any major troubles, but I did notice some off-gassing on rare occasions during charging (nasty H2S). Best to keep those in a well-ventilated area. LFP batteries are not in the same category, though.
 
Very awesome flanged outlet there.

I should clarify that the EF Delta Pro is inside the master bedroom…I put it behind a recliner…. But of course she can see the thick yellow 10AWG extension cord running off it that goes to a AC surge protector power strip under our bed.
Perhaps go with a more neutral color like white, black or brown? They make things to hide extension cords also you might look into.

You can not connect to your Main panel to power circuits from the Eco-Flow without having a transfer switch or breaker interlock installed. It is not a matter of the grid being up or down since these power boxes do not allow for grid parallel operation.
 
May as well get out the knob and tube kit and while you are at it may as well use some cloth wire jumpers and bare aluminum wire to connect the outlets. Be about as safe in the end.

I will watch for your post in the "up in smoke.... learn from my mistakes" section. I really do hope nobody is injured due to your lack of foresight and imagination.

If you are going to "play" with electricity you should understand the corners you cut and who could be hurt.

If you want to have more of a turn-key setup verse DIY the eco series boxes are fine for that. There are a number of reports of flameout failures. Not many but enough they should be kept out of any living space.

For your family you should get an interlock breaker and critical loads panel and wire things properly. Keep the eco and any batteries in the garage where there is a 4 hour burn time between you and it. And make sure to use the proper Eco accessories when you do it. If you have no garage the figure out the right way to put them away from where you live.

LiFePO4 batteries are pretty safe, much safer that most other chemistries. But if they short or have a failure. These are the chemicals that are expelled. None will kill right off, but the hydrogen will burn and the others are toxic especially to pets and children.

  1. Carbon Dioxide (CO2): In small amounts, CO2 is not harmful. However, in high concentrations, it can lead to respiratory distress and, in extreme cases, suffocation.
  2. Carbon Monoxide (CO): CO is a highly toxic gas that can be lethal. It binds to hemoglobin in the blood, reducing the blood's ability to carry oxygen. Exposure can lead to headaches, dizziness, nausea, confusion, and in severe cases, death.
  3. Hydrogen (H2): Hydrogen is not toxic, but it is highly flammable. Accumulation of hydrogen gas can create an explosion risk if ignited.
  4. Phosphorus Oxyfluoride (POF3): This is a toxic and corrosive gas. Inhalation can cause respiratory irritation, coughing, and shortness of breath. Long-term exposure can lead to more severe respiratory problems.
  5. Lithium Fluoride (LiF): While not typically a major concern in its gaseous form, any particulate matter from LiF can irritate the respiratory system if inhaled.
  6. Various Organic Compounds: The toxicity of these compounds varies depending on their specific nature. Some may cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory system, while others could have more severe toxic effects.


So, yes in my opinion you are being stupid.
 
May as well get out the knob and tube kit and while you are at it may as well use some cloth wire jumpers and bare aluminum wire to connect the outlets. Be about as safe in the end.

I will watch for your post in the "up in smoke.... learn from my mistakes" section. I really do hope nobody is injured due to your lack of foresight and imagination.

If you are going to "play" with electricity you should understand the corners you cut and who could be hurt.

If you want to have more of a turn-key setup verse DIY the eco series boxes are fine for that. There are a number of reports of flameout failures. Not many but enough they should be kept out of any living space.

For your family you should get an interlock breaker and critical loads panel and wire things properly. Keep the eco and any batteries in the garage where there is a 4 hour burn time between you and it. And make sure to use the proper Eco accessories when you do it. If you have no garage the figure out the right way to put them away from where you live.

LiFePO4 batteries are pretty safe, much safer that most other chemistries. But if they short or have a failure. These are the chemicals that are expelled. None will kill right off, but the hydrogen will burn and the others are toxic especially to pets and children.

  1. Carbon Dioxide (CO2): In small amounts, CO2 is not harmful. However, in high concentrations, it can lead to respiratory distress and, in extreme cases, suffocation.
  2. Carbon Monoxide (CO): CO is a highly toxic gas that can be lethal. It binds to hemoglobin in the blood, reducing the blood's ability to carry oxygen. Exposure can lead to headaches, dizziness, nausea, confusion, and in severe cases, death.
  3. Hydrogen (H2): Hydrogen is not toxic, but it is highly flammable. Accumulation of hydrogen gas can create an explosion risk if ignited.
  4. Phosphorus Oxyfluoride (POF3): This is a toxic and corrosive gas. Inhalation can cause respiratory irritation, coughing, and shortness of breath. Long-term exposure can lead to more severe respiratory problems.
  5. Lithium Fluoride (LiF): While not typically a major concern in its gaseous form, any particulate matter from LiF can irritate the respiratory system if inhaled.
  6. Various Organic Compounds: The toxicity of these compounds varies depending on their specific nature. Some may cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory system, while others could have more severe toxic effects.


So, yes in my opinion you are being stupid.
Hitting the sauce Squid? relax everybody is pointing him in that direction nice and slow.. no need for the hyperbole.
 
Hitting the sauce Squid? relax everybody is pointing him in that direction nice and slow.. no need for the hyperbole.

Perhaps I am. Maybe I thought some were not being blunt enough. And my excuse is I had shoulder surgery a week and a bit ago and I am still on pain killers, goood ones.

I still agree with my points though.
 
Yes, she hates it.

What is the easiest option here?
Disconnect wife

And no, I'm not misogynistic, I just think life is too short to spend with petty people, male or female. Having a few extension cords visible around the house is not something to get worked up about. If that is a major issue for someone, they must have no serious issues to deal with, and should be appreciative of all the positive things they have rather than focusing on an extension cord here or there.
 
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May as well get out the knob and tube kit and while you are at it may as well use some cloth wire jumpers and bare aluminum wire to connect the outlets. Be about as safe in the end.

I will watch for your post in the "up in smoke.... learn from my mistakes" section. I really do hope nobody is injured due to your lack of foresight and imagination.

If you are going to "play" with electricity you should understand the corners you cut and who could be hurt.

If you want to have more of a turn-key setup verse DIY the eco series boxes are fine for that. There are a number of reports of flameout failures. Not many but enough they should be kept out of any living space.

For your family you should get an interlock breaker and critical loads panel and wire things properly. Keep the eco and any batteries in the garage where there is a 4 hour burn time between you and it. And make sure to use the proper Eco accessories when you do it. If you have no garage the figure out the right way to put them away from where you live.

LiFePO4 batteries are pretty safe, much safer that most other chemistries. But if they short or have a failure. These are the chemicals that are expelled. None will kill right off, but the hydrogen will burn and the others are toxic especially to pets and children.

  1. Carbon Dioxide (CO2): In small amounts, CO2 is not harmful. However, in high concentrations, it can lead to respiratory distress and, in extreme cases, suffocation.
  2. Carbon Monoxide (CO): CO is a highly toxic gas that can be lethal. It binds to hemoglobin in the blood, reducing the blood's ability to carry oxygen. Exposure can lead to headaches, dizziness, nausea, confusion, and in severe cases, death.
  3. Hydrogen (H2): Hydrogen is not toxic, but it is highly flammable. Accumulation of hydrogen gas can create an explosion risk if ignited.
  4. Phosphorus Oxyfluoride (POF3): This is a toxic and corrosive gas. Inhalation can cause respiratory irritation, coughing, and shortness of breath. Long-term exposure can lead to more severe respiratory problems.
  5. Lithium Fluoride (LiF): While not typically a major concern in its gaseous form, any particulate matter from LiF can irritate the respiratory system if inhaled.
  6. Various Organic Compounds: The toxicity of these compounds varies depending on their specific nature. Some may cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory system, while others could have more severe toxic effects.


So, yes in my opinion you are being stupid.
Yikes!
 
May as well get out the knob and tube kit and while you are at it may as well use some cloth wire jumpers and bare aluminum wire to connect the outlets. Be about as safe in the end.

I will watch for your post in the "up in smoke.... learn from my mistakes" section. I really do hope nobody is injured due to your lack of foresight and imagination.

If you are going to "play" with electricity you should understand the corners you cut and who could be hurt.

If you want to have more of a turn-key setup verse DIY the eco series boxes are fine for that. There are a number of reports of flameout failures. Not many but enough they should be kept out of any living space.

For your family you should get an interlock breaker and critical loads panel and wire things properly. Keep the eco and any batteries in the garage where there is a 4 hour burn time between you and it. And make sure to use the proper Eco accessories when you do it. If you have no garage the figure out the right way to put them away from where you live.

LiFePO4 batteries are pretty safe, much safer that most other chemistries. But if they short or have a failure. These are the chemicals that are expelled. None will kill right off, but the hydrogen will burn and the others are toxic especially to pets and children.

  1. Carbon Dioxide (CO2): In small amounts, CO2 is not harmful. However, in high concentrations, it can lead to respiratory distress and, in extreme cases, suffocation.
  2. Carbon Monoxide (CO): CO is a highly toxic gas that can be lethal. It binds to hemoglobin in the blood, reducing the blood's ability to carry oxygen. Exposure can lead to headaches, dizziness, nausea, confusion, and in severe cases, death.
  3. Hydrogen (H2): Hydrogen is not toxic, but it is highly flammable. Accumulation of hydrogen gas can create an explosion risk if ignited.
  4. Phosphorus Oxyfluoride (POF3): This is a toxic and corrosive gas. Inhalation can cause respiratory irritation, coughing, and shortness of breath. Long-term exposure can lead to more severe respiratory problems.
  5. Lithium Fluoride (LiF): While not typically a major concern in its gaseous form, any particulate matter from LiF can irritate the respiratory system if inhaled.
  6. Various Organic Compounds: The toxicity of these compounds varies depending on their specific nature. Some may cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory system, while others could have more severe toxic effects.


So, yes in my opinion you are being stupid.
Could you please explain how the Eco products are any more dangerous, statistically, than any other lifepo4 home power solution? Could you please provide actual data instead of an old and anecdotal thread started on this forum by a member who was using his units in a way to poseibly cause his supposed multiple failures himself? Where and when have these “flame-outs” that you spoke of been reported? Under what operating conditions did they take place? I am genuinely curious as I’ve been using four delta pro units daily for the past eight months, give or take, and would hate to be putting anybody at risk. If the danger involved in these units is as extreme, or even close to, as bad as your claims then I would certainly like to be aware. Where did you get the statistics for Eco products? Is the rate of fire/failure danger greater than any other diy system? Where did you get the stats to compare the two? It seems any idiot with a wrench can put a diy system together, as evidenced by this forum, so how does that make those systems any safer than the Eco systems? Again, please inform us all how you formed your analysis. It seems to me that any system with wiring, fuses, switches, multiple connections of multiple parts and especially multiple batteries is installed with the inherent risk that something could go wrong. So how is an eco system worse? How many diy systems have failed/caused a safety issue in comparison? Who is keeping these records? Is it your job to compile them or just to analyze them? If you have some empirical evidence to share I’m sure it would be appreciated by multiple interested parties.
 
yeah agreed, but take my little camper for instance, even thought the batteries are in the front storage space it is separated from the adults bed by a piece of 1/4" veneer so not a whole lot of difference.
@Daddy Tanuki
OMG only 1/4" veneer?! Are you crazy? Are you trying to engulf the entire country of Japan in flames? Don't you know that Japanese electrical code specifies there must be at least 1 tatami mat and 1 sliding paper door between a sleeping area and a solar battery?? 😉
 
@Daddy Tanuki
OMG only 1/4" veneer?! Are you crazy? Are you trying to engulf the entire country of Japan in flames? Don't you know that Japanese electrical code specifies there must be at least 1 tatami mat and 1 sliding paper door between a sleeping area and a solar battery?? 😉
yeah its a european camper... they are specialists at using really thin wood to make things lightweight (and not very durable).
 
Thinking about sleeping with dangerous things reminds me of a few dates I had when I was younger. I would not be especially worried about the having the power box in the bedroom. Many of us have campers or boats where much more hazardous things are just a few inches away.
 
I'm a hater of extension leads too.

But I'm a bigger hater of any form of energy storage bigger than a smartphone in a bedroom!! (and I think carefully about smartphones too, but mainly coz the ruddy things pling and ring at the most inopportune moments).

Even the very safe LiFePO4 can go wrong and let all that energy out when it shouldn't. If it should let go, you're not going to be posting here that you had a failure :(
Rut Roh. I have 400Ah of LiFePO4 installed under my bed in my RV. When my 3rd SOK comes in next week, it will be 600Ah.
IMG_5769.jpeg
 
There are surface mount raceways for wire management sold in many hardware stores and on line.

They come in plastic and metallic versions.

An example brand is legrand but there are others as well.

Pretty easy to assemble and mount at various height levels on the wall.

There are also surface mount electrical mounting setups for instance when mounting electrical onto concrete walls.
 
Put the battery outside.
Or how about
"Put wife outside. Breathe sigh of relief."
She's not only stressing you out over something minor, she's got 75 other dudes here on the forum stressed out trying to figure out how to help you satisfy her. lol.
Just kidding!
Be nice to that lady! You better obey her or else you're gonna be real sorry! 😉
 
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Lose this battle. Ditch the solar generator. Move on.

You will never make her happy with that solar generator there.
Wow, this guy gets it. In fact, you won't make her happy no matter what you do. Get rid of the extension cords and the solar generator, and next she will be irritated by the mole under your ear and you'll need to get that removed.
Ask me how I know.
I've dated women like this.
 
Could you please explain how the Eco products are any more dangerous, statistically, than any other lifepo4 home power solution? Could you please provide actual data instead of an old and anecdotal thread started on this forum by a member who was using his units in a way to poseibly cause his supposed multiple failures himself? Where and when have these “flame-outs” that you spoke of been reported? Under what operating conditions did they take place? I am genuinely curious as I’ve been using four delta pro units daily for the past eight months, give or take, and would hate to be putting anybody at risk. If the danger involved in these units is as extreme, or even close to, as bad as your claims then I would certainly like to be aware. Where did you get the statistics for Eco products? Is the rate of fire/failure danger greater than any other diy system? Where did you get the stats to compare the two? It seems any idiot with a wrench can put a diy system together, as evidenced by this forum, so how does that make those systems any safer than the Eco systems? Again, please inform us all how you formed your analysis. It seems to me that any system with wiring, fuses, switches, multiple connections of multiple parts and especially multiple batteries is installed with the inherent risk that something could go wrong. So how is an eco system worse? How many diy systems have failed/caused a safety issue in comparison? Who is keeping these records? Is it your job to compile them or just to analyze them? If you have some empirical evidence to share I’m sure it would be appreciated by multiple interested parties.


Touchy touchy, sarcasm much? Me YES....

The way the OP intends to us it with extension cords everywhere is what makes it dangerous. This goes for a turn key echo or a home brew solar generator. If you are going to do whole house backup it should be hooked into a panel and not in a living space.

As for flame-outs you have a unit, perhaps you should google and do some research. The things I read decided me against the eco units.

I'll chalk up the rest of your rant to a total lack of a sense of humor. I had mine extracted many years back, but recently had it reinstalled to see what I have been missing. It has decided to start eviction proceedings against my brain.

That and the cost associated with them. Nobody makes solar generator that has features I want for a price I consider reasonable. Mostly to low capacity and extra batteries cost to much. And no user servicable parts inside.

I built a backup for my CPAP that I keep next to the bed. And a UPS that is under my desk in my office. Both of those replace UPS with SLA batteries so much better capacity without the leaks/off gassing. Neither is currently available for a reasonable price if at all.
 
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