diy solar

diy solar

I am really struggling. Neutral and hot both are energized.

Incandescent, good.

Can you confirm that with light bulb between N and G, the light did not even glow dimly, and there was still 57V while the bulb was connected?
Just confirmed. 65v now and NO light whatsoever. ?
 
Confirm continuity on the bulb.

Get a light switch and run a wire between n and g. Close switch with fire extinguisher handy. You have a classic floating neutral.
 
Just confirmed. 65v now and NO light whatsoever. ?

I don't get it. 65V applied to bulb, not enough current to make it glow.
I expected either the resistance would pull voltage to zero, or the applied voltage would light up bulb somewhat.

If you have ammeter, you could measure current through bulb. If current is flowing, that confirms you can't bond neutral to ground.

Have to get to the bottom of this before bonding, don't want to risk damage.
 
I don't get it. 65V applied to bulb, not enough current to make it glow.
I expected either the resistance would pull voltage to zero, or the applied voltage would light up bulb somewhat.

If you have ammeter, you could measure current through bulb. If current is flowing, that confirms you can't bond neutral to ground.

Have to get to the bottom of this before bonding, don't want to risk damage.
I don't get it. 65V applied to bulb, not enough current to make it glow.
I expected either the resistance would pull voltage to zero, or the applied voltage would light up bulb somewhat.

If you have ammeter, you could measure current through bulb. If current is flowing, that confirms you can't bond neutral to ground.

Have to get to the bottom of this before bonding, don't want to risk damage.
First pic: lightbulb between Neutral and ground

Second pic: voltmeter between N and G

3rd pic: lightbulb between L and N
 

Attachments

  • 581BB98B-FAD1-4977-855F-7ACF9AF80680.png
    581BB98B-FAD1-4977-855F-7ACF9AF80680.png
    7.3 MB · Views: 28
  • A27EA574-0025-4769-AA2C-CD259E25A9C9.png
    A27EA574-0025-4769-AA2C-CD259E25A9C9.png
    8 MB · Views: 27
  • 680B9B32-B9A4-4B97-8E5F-7D139D9C8A77.png
    680B9B32-B9A4-4B97-8E5F-7D139D9C8A77.png
    6.9 MB · Views: 28
First pic: lightbulb between Neutral and ground

Second pic: voltmeter between N and G

3rd pic: lightbulb between L and N

4th pic, lightbulb AND voltmeter between N and G?

Although, Tim has just posted that this model inverter is fine with N/G bonding. But first you might as well confirm with lightbulb AND voltmeter, to learn and post picture for new members.
 
Tim, so I should just run a wire between the ground bar and the neutral bar( in the panel) like the prior gentleman suggested?

Which takes care of bonding neutral and ground.

You should also run a wire to a ground rod, and bond it to any other metal things like pipes or foundation steel running through building.
Also run a ground wire to PV panel frames from inverter.

I do recommend using GFCI breakers, outlets, or portable where appropriate. Refrigerator circuit is one where you might not, but anything else you could come in contact with.
 
4th pic, lightbulb AND voltmeter between N and G?

Although, Tim has just posted that this model inverter is fine with N/G bonding. But first you might as well confirm with lightbulb AND voltmeter, to learn and post picture for new members.
I’ll try. I only have 2 hands. Haha
 
Which takes care of bonding neutral and ground.

You should also run a wire to a ground rod, and bond it to any other metal things like pipes or foundation steel running through building.
Also run a ground wire to PV panel frames from inverter.

I do recommend using GFCI breakers, outlets, or portable where appropriate. Refrigerator circuit is one where you might not, but anything else you could come in contact with.
I do have a #6 grounding wire attached to a ground rod. Unfortunately, I don’t have anything else metal to attach to. No plumbing, etc. Thank you again. I’ll let you know how this goes. Also, you said a #10 wire between N and G bars?
 
You could put in the green ground screw to bond neutral/ground bar to box, move all ground wires to that bar, remove the extra ground bar.
Technically I think a wire between the bars should be sufficient to trip largest (or all?) breaker, but your will never see more than inverter can drive.

The deal is, we don't want to rely on current through steel box to protect branch circuits. Only good conductors. Bonding box protects for short to box.

Better to get things wired somehow so you keep your hands off. The moment you use two hands, it is more dangerous (ask me how I know!)
 
If no plumbing, no hazard. The risk is plumbing grounded by being in the dirt, and it is a different potential than the appliance you touch. Want all bonded together.
 
The green panel bonding screw is rated for the full possible fault current available from the panel.
(If you still have it) otherwise a wire will do.
 
The green panel bonding screw is rated for the full possible fault current available from the panel.
(If you still have it) otherwise a wire will do.
What’s weird is I had the ground screw in yesterday and was still getting all the weird electrical problems. I removed it and still was messed up. Only now I put the ground wire between G and N and it seemed to fix the issue.
 
The green panel bonding screw is rated for the full possible fault current available from the panel.
(If you still have it) otherwise a wire will do.

One size screw fits all panels.
It is a lot smaller than the required ground wire for 100A or 200A circuit. But just a short jump between busbar and box.
It does have places to sink its heat, but if it was carrying hundred or so amps and not tripping breaker (e.g. fault from a resistive element contacting enclosure, or other really bad connections), I'd expect it to glow red.

I figure it can fast-trip a breaker, but I want copper from the fault back to where neutral is bonded. In equipment we design with ground interconnections between modules, sheet metal is not allowed to be part of the circuit daisy chained to other places.

If OP was going to use both the dedicated ground bar and the combined neutral/ground bar, I'd recommend a wire between them regardless of the screw. Avoid relying on rusted steel for safety ground of appliances.
 
It's rated and listed for the purpose.
There are of course other acceptable options. And some could be considered preferable.
 
I am nowhere near grid power. Unless I pay them to run the nearest electric 5 miles to my house through the wilderness. I don’t have over a million bucks in my bank account. ?
What part of the country is the grid this far away?
 

diy solar

diy solar
Back
Top