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Paralleled EG-4 6500EX on a 120V single phase system?

apctjb

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Considering swapping my existing inverters for a pair of EG-4 6500EX inverters. I don't have an 240VAC loads so wired my system for 120V.

My understanding is the EG-4 6500EX is 120/240 with a single inverter (curious to hear how they do that, auto transformer or 2 internal inverters set 180 apart). Can it be configured to supply 120V with full 6500W output and can 2 be paralleled at 120V with 13,000W output?

Thanks!
 
Considering swapping my existing inverters for a pair of EG-4 6500EX inverters. I don't have an 240VAC loads so wired my system for 120V.

My understanding is the EG-4 6500EX is 120/240 with a single inverter (curious to hear how they do that, auto transformer or 2 internal inverters set 180 apart). Can it be configured to supply 120V with full 6500W output and can 2 be paralleled at 120V with 13,000W output?

Thanks!
Two inverters in a single enclosure.
No transformer.
Split-phase is single phase. (Not 180° apart)
Two can be put in parallel to supply 13kw.
You can connect 240v or 120v loads.
To get the full output for 120v loads, you will need to balance your loads between the two legs.

Edit: they are 120v , not split-phase.
 
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You should be looking at the 6000 XP instead now though, it is a much superior unit in every way.
 
What do you have currently that makes you consider upgrading?

There are lots of better options out there.

I would avoid that Voltronic variant unless you can find the original 250V MPPT version from MPP.
 
Considering swapping my existing inverters for a pair of EG-4 6500EX inverters. I don't have an 240VAC loads so wired my system for 120V.

You can run 120v stuff on a 240v split phase system. With a 240v split phase system you can use a standard breaker panel with 120v (OR 240v) breakers as needed. no creative wiring required, thus everything is the same as a grid panel. With the plethora of 240v split phase systems on the market these days, unless your needs are like 3kw or something to run a fridge and some lighting, I think it would be ignorant to purchase and wire up a 120v only unit. There is no benefit whatsoever and many drawbacks.

Devices are generally more efficient at 240v thus if you ever do get any 240v stuff your ready to rock if you need to replace 110v devices/appliances that have 220v options. Anybody that comes in to look will get a standard wiring and panel arrangement.

You don't want the 6500EX, spend the extra money and get the 6000XP.
 
What do you have currently that makes you consider upgrading?
Growatt 3000's in parallel; they have worked great but buggy MPPT wakeup and monitoring via Solar Assistant.
 
Not intuitive why 240 appliances would be more efficient other than than IR loss, I just don't have big power draw loads. My mini splits are all 120 and they are the biggest load. I have split phase panels but have them jumper so both legs are on one phase. That way I don't have to balance loads. Would be nice to keep it that way but sounds like I should consider the EG4-6000 instead of the 6500 and those are only 120/240 so I would have to rewire to 240. Am I getting this right?
 
You should be looking at the 6000 XP instead now though, it is a much superior unit in every way.

Open to suggestions. Can you elaborate why the 6000 XP is superior and how does it provide 120/240 in a single unit. (Autotransformer or 2 internal inverters). Can it run only 120V or must be 120/240.?
 
You will definitely be happier with the 6kxp.
And yes, you will rewire the panels for split-phase.
 
Would be nice to keep it that way
If your not dead set on the EG4 brand SRNE makes some 5kW 120V units that can be stacked in parallel for 120V only or 120V / 240V. The HYP or HES models, double check the HES some have low voltage MPPT, others are 500V.
They are re-labeled by SGP, Powmr Ecoworthy and others.

Iirc Growatt also has something in the price range and there is always Victron.

I'd have to double check the manual but the 6000XP might be able to configured for 120V 6000W.
 
Open to suggestions. Can you elaborate why the 6000 XP is superior and how does it provide 120/240 in a single unit. (Autotransformer or 2 internal inverters). Can it run only 120V or must be 120/240.?
The 6000XP may be problematic. It seems to lack any setting for preferred mode. I garner this from reported issues from some people on the Forum who have this model. It also is limited to only run as a split phase unit thus you have only 3kW per leg which sounds like it would not be enough for your needs unless more units bought. It is a 2 inverter in one box setup giving 2 phase (split phase in effect) versus a LF transformer style.

Before buying any model be sure and research the model's specs and manual. There can be unpleasant surprises otherwise.
 
The 6000XP may be problematic.
How so?
I garner this from reported issues from some people on the Forum who have this model.
What issues?
It also is limited to only run as a split phase unit
Which provides both, 120v and 240v for loads.
you have only 3kW per leg which sounds like it would not be enough for your needs unless more units bought.
3kw per leg (2 legs) is a total of 6kw.
. It is a 2 inverter in one box setup
True
giving 2 phase
There is no such thing as a 2 phase inverter.
Split-phase is single phase.
 
Split-phase is single phase.

I know you this stuff better than most so perhaps semantics, but the 120/240 volt system in the US, often referred to as split phase power, involves two 120 V AC lines that are out of phase by 180 degrees with each other relative to the neutral line. This configuration allows for both 120 V and 240 V supplies, where the 240 V is achieved by using the voltage difference between these two out-of-phase lines. The term "split phase" indicates that the single-phase supply is divided at a center tapped transformer, creating two 120 V lines that are electrically 180 degrees apart, thus providing versatility for different household and commercial applications .
 
There is no such thing as a 2 phase inverter.

Not sure if there is, but certainly not hard to do. Take 2-3K inverters, like my Growatts, configure for 120/240 (out of phase 180 to neutral) and put them in one enclosure and in essence you have a 2 phase inverter. I suspect the 6000XP does the same unless it has a auto transformer, but then it would not be truly transformer less.
 
Not sure if there is, but certainly not hard to do. Take 2-3K inverters, like my Growatts, configure for 120/240 (out of phase 180 to neutral) and put them in one enclosure and in essence you have a 2 phase inverter. I suspect the 6000XP does the same unless it has a auto transformer, but then it would not be truly transformer less.
Transformer less is a very confusion adding term in solar/inverters. Stick with “doesn’t have an autotransformer” and you are safe

If there is a mix of low and high voltage components and low voltage components are user serviceable then there are always going to be isolation transformers. Now they can be low frequency or high frequency, sure.

Modern grid tie inverters are typically transformer less / non isolated between DC and 240VAC side

Two phase in American electrician english does not refer to the degree difference in 120/240 so you should not use that word (it refers to a different rare phase angle)
 
And yes it is relevant to your question whether it is two 120V inverters inside or one + an AT, wrt the possible capacity. In addition to what the firmware can do
 
FWIW the market appears to be heading towards 120/240 in favor of 120 inverters so might consider ripping the bandaid off now for converting to split phase panel
 
Incorrect
Split-phase is single phase. There is one one phase, one sine wave, all current moves together in the same direction.
From the perspective of the second internal inverter the world is indeed upside down though

It is itself connected output upside down so the double negative brings the two back in the same direction.
 
Not sure if there is, but certainly not hard to do. Take 2-3K inverters, like my Growatts, configure for 120/240 (out of phase 180 to neutral) and put them in one enclosure and in essence you have a 2 phase inverter. I suspect the 6000XP does the same unless it has a auto transformer, but then it would not be truly transformer less.
Your understanding of current flow is flawed.
It's not your fault. There's a lot of misinformation on the internet.
I'm not sure why so many people have trouble understanding split-phase.
Most members here, seem to grasp the concept of connecting power sources in series. (Batteries & solar panels) But they don't seem to realize that split-phase is the same thing.
When sources are connected in series, the voltage is additive and the amperage stays constant.
Split-phase is two 120v sources in series. It's just that simple.
 
From the perspective of the second internal inverter the world is indeed upside down though

It is itself connected output upside down so the double negative brings the two back in the same direction.
There is no "double negative" , whatever that means.
It's just two 120v inverters connected in series.
Each one provides 120v. And together, they provide 240v.
 

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