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Electric oven

2200W seem to be pretty much standard in here. To burn frozen pizza in our oven it takes about 16 minutes with pizza put in cold oven.
I'd estimate that getting up to temp takes maybe 8 minutes and after that the oven is cycling at 30% power.
Maybe 400Wh to bake a frozen pizza in that case.
This is right in line with what I've seen with my 30" self cleaning. While you're drawing a couple of Kw steadily while it's preheating (mine is more like ten minutes,) the insulation is so good that once you're up to temperature it cycles with pretty short "on" periods. The outside is cool, even on top. Once you heat the insides it doesn't take much power to keep it at temperature.

Just don't run the self-cleaning cycle between November and February. I hate the smell anyway. I line the bottom with tin foil....
 
Many Aussie offgrid homes use electric stoves and ovens(although daytime cooking is preferred over nightime- easier on the batteries lol)
But then we tend to have fairly large solar arrays (10kw 'used' to be the most common size for rural properties, now 20kw and even more are becoming the norm...)
My own will be 18kw when fully up and installed (gotta finish the house first though) and that is going to be all electric

Although I have found that I really don't need an oven these days (the only thing I ever used mine for was making ham and cheese toasties)- and I haven't found anything yet that I couldn't comfortable cook in the 'camp kitchen' in the shed - all electric, and thats only running off the 1.5kw 'temporary' array at the shed... (out of sight is an electric 2 burner 'tabletop' hotplate 'stove'- which hardly gets used anymore anyway- I mostly used that for pancakes in the morning, until I found I could cook them in the airfryer lol)- btw the airfryers are great for even the biggest pizza
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All running off a 12v 1600Ah lithium battery bank (16x 400Ah 4S4P), and a 12v 8kw inverter, with 6x 250w secondhand solar panels
When I had rellies staying last year- that 'camp kitchen' was cooking for 6 people with no issues (and quite frankly it didn't take much longer than it would have in a 'normal' kitchen...)
The caravan still has its LPG gas oven, but it hasn't been turned on in probably 5 years now- there probably isn't any gas left in the cylinder by now...
 
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Sounds like you consider using propane as being somewhat still on the grid. Remember that off grid electrical systems can fail, needing days (weeks?) to solve. If you already have some propane capability, keep it around. The fuel does not go stale like gasoline.

Depending on your eating habits, countertop appliances can go a long way. A full scale electric oven does not need to be used when the clouds linger.
Good point , I had not considered the system shutting down and I dont really want to run the genny to use an oven .
We always have a little camping cooker on hand as when we lived on grid there were always power cuts !
 
Sounds like you consider using propane as being somewhat still on the grid. Remember that off grid electrical systems can fail, needing days (weeks?) to solve. If you already have some propane capability, keep it around. The fuel does not go stale like gasoline.

Depending on your eating habits, countertop appliances can go a long way. A full scale electric oven does not need to be used when the clouds linger.
I was thinking about the same thing. Non-electric back up's can also go a long way. Most of us have a 2 burner Coleman (or similar) camping stove. I have one that uses screw on 1lb propane bottles.
 
I've been yelling back and forth to another room where the boss is doing something in the kitchen, to consult with my local expert. I am told 1) The oven is on for about 10 minutes to heat up, then just sort of "pulses" on and off every little bit, even at 400 degrees (higher than she usually uses, which is 350). So, I think we can safely say about 750-800 watts for an hour's actual use. I'll use 1KW for the once per month we need it, for calculations. 2) Induction cooktop is way better than gas, and if I force her to use gas again in the new house I'll be making my own meals. 3) Air fryers are amazing, and often much better than an oven (e.g., chicken wings). We'll have propane at the new house for some things, but NOT for cooking.
 
cooking. Does anyone have an electric stove on thier Emporia? It's probably not so much about average kWh per day as would be what the highest days of the month would be.

what numbers do you want? We are a family of 6 and we use the oven here and there, more so stove top cooking. We general do more oven cooking in the winter too according to my numbers, but our highest usage was Aug this past year. I think we did 2 family parties with lots of cooking done buy us if I recall..
 

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what numbers do you want? We are a family of 6 and we use the oven here and there, more so stove top cooking. We general do more oven cooking in the winter too according to my numbers, but our highest usage was Aug this past year. I think we did 2 family parties with lots of cooking done buy us if I recall..
Thanks for confirming my back of the napkin numbers! It does appear that an electric oven/stove top is well within the realm of even a modest system.
 
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We have a GE electric stove/oven that came with this manufactured house, it's about 20 years old. It has one large burner element and three smaller ones on the stove top. I'm curious as to how much power a small element uses. The breaker in the house panel has a double pole 40A breaker, but I'm guessing that's for in case you're using all 4 elements and the oven?

I guess I could figure it out with a current clamp meter on the wires in the house panel but I don't have one just yet.

We rarely use the oven, if we're making a pie or casserole we just use our toaster oven, which runs on 120V and uses about 1.5KW when the element is on.
 
Thanks for confirming my back of the napkin numbers! It does appear that an electric oven/stove top is well within the realm of even a modest system.
Like I said, I do all my cooking on electric here, and thats on a tiny 1.5kw of of panels on the 'temporary' array at the shed- 6 of the 7 250w panels shown here are charging the sheds battery bank,(the other just runs a UV sterilising lamp and 'stirrer' water pump in the water tank behind them- they only needed a 25W panel, but I have 72 of these panels here, and I wasn't going to buy a $50 panel thats only 1/5th of the wattage of the ones sitting here lol- that I paid $27 each for!!)

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There's 750W facing north, and the 750W facing west for afternoon production each on its own MPPT controller- just as the north array is dropping in power, the west array is just starting to climb to its peak- and continues right until sunset (long after the north array has dropped down into the mud)
In spring and autumn, I get about 7-8kwh a day from them, less in summer due to the heat, and only slightly less again in winter...
 
There are only two things that I've come across that won't work with my countertop toaster oven - a full-size turkey, which is only made on Thanksgiving - and large frozen pizzas. Everything else fits into it.

If you aren't baking those things and are just using your standard 9x13" casserole dish to bake stuff in, these things are great. They use way less energy. If you go this route, though, be sure to confirm the internal size - some are bigger than others and the smaller ones are just small enough that your standard 9x13" casserole dish won't fit if it has handles (ask me how I know....)

The downside is that they take up space on the counter top, or somewhere else if you put them away after usage (like I do).
which one do you have?
 
which one do you have?
One is a Hamilton Beach 31100 - but it's an older model that they don't make anymore. I can fit 14.5 inch wide dishes in there.

I also have a Cuisinart Air Fryer/Toaster Oven - the TOA-60. It works well for what it is. But the widest dish you can fit in there is just under 12.5 inches. It's not nearly as useful, but does a good job at baking what will fit inside.
 
I know this has been asked but I haven't found the answer without people suggesting propane. We have been living off grid about 3 years now in a small cabin and are building a house. My goal is off grid and don't want anything propane. We are building a house. It will be about 2000 square feet 2 stories. With wood boiler radiant heat and 120 volt heat pump water heater. The dryer will be heat pump also. We will have a grundfos well pump and induction range. With 3 eg4 6000xp and 4 of the power pro batteries and 26kw of solar panels. Do you think with this set up it would be possible to go off grid completely. I know add up the kw blah blah. We will be conscious of what we are running but has anyone had real world experience off grid with electric oven?

we have grid, but have been moving closer and closer to off grid mode, well because I want to
we are off grid in effect April to Oct.
1 XW Pro 6.8kw inverter
60 kwh of battery
7.3 kw of panels in winter
9.0 kw of panels in summer (I can lay panels in yard without snow on them)

Need more panels and battery

wife won't use gas (bad childhood experiences) so here is a link to my adding a Solar 14-50r receptacle
so I can choose which source to use

 
I know this has been asked but I haven't found the answer without people suggesting propane. We have been living off grid about 3 years now in a small cabin and are building a house. My goal is off grid and don't want anything propane. We are building a house. It will be about 2000 square feet 2 stories. With wood boiler radiant heat and 120 volt heat pump water heater. The dryer will be heat pump also. We will have a grundfos well pump and induction range. With 3 eg4 6000xp and 4 of the power pro batteries and 26kw of solar panels. Do you think with this set up it would be possible to go off grid completely. I know add up the kw blah blah. We will be conscious of what we are running but has anyone had real world experience off grid with electric oven?

YES

that is 18kw of AC, great amount of solar input. Design system to accept a 4th XP in the future. Just be watchful of loads

and get a chargeverter to charge battery by generator. Use 2 or 3 chargeverters overtime if needed
Don't feed generator into inverters. use 50 amp generator feeder circuit. I have 2 CVs

you can always use smaller generators now get bigger later
 
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This assumes you get a lower end induction range. Cooktop can be even less. This is from the Frigidaire web site, I paid something less than $1000 for mine.

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I did not get a sufficient answer online as to how the oven of an induction range cooks the food. Can someone who has one explain?
 
The demand on induction (which i have) is no better or worse than a standard surface unit, though it will boil water much faster if you have the right cookware.
Curious, which induction stove do you have? I had a Electrolux EI30IF40LS. It had high ratings but this model was sadly discontinued.

30" Induction Freestanding Range with Induction Cooktop and IQ-Touch™ Controls | Electrolux

BTW, is not that big of a deal fot cookware add many make it. I believe it's under 5% nickel content which is much more readily avaliable now days. You can also use cast iron cookware.
 
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I can say once you get use to induction, you'll never get a regular electric cooktop again. I have the least expensive frigidare. The first time you mop up a boil over you'll be sold, just throw the towl down and run it under the pot.
💯% agree... clean up is a cinch. Heck you can clean up WHILE you are cooking & not steam/ scorch your self with a wet rag while cleaning. Not to mention the other safety aspects. Instant on, instant off, instant higher or lower temperatures.

So much safer with kids! I could have boilng water on & then place my hand flat on the stove 1/4" away from the pot...totally safe. Then there is the fact that if the pot isn't on, the heat stops instantly. And...while there is some conduction, you can remove the pot of boilng water & lightly touch the surface. And no fear of gas issues. Lastly if the pan is removed, it will automatically shut itself off eventually.

You can also put any size pot/pan on & it adapts... even a double wide griddle. Nothing boils water faster... not even gas. You can use your cast iron cookware if desired. Induction is the best.

We are currently building (slowly) our home. Right now the plan is to have a propane range side by side with the induction stove top. However, it seems that it might be cheaper to have 2 full ranges side by side.
 
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I was thinking about the same thing. Non-electric back up's can also go a long way. Most of us have a 2 burner Coleman (or similar) camping stove. I have one that uses screw on 1lb propane bottles.
Living off- grid is about having a backup for your backup...period. Nothing should be off the table in my mind.
 
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